Showing posts with label Shrine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shrine. Show all posts

23 Jul 2017

EDO - muken no kane bell

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. Persons and People of Edo - Personen .
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Muken no Kane 無間の鐘 "Unlimited Bell", "Soundless Bell", "the Bell of Muken"
mugen no kane 無限の鐘 - "The Bell of Hell"
mugen jigoku / muken jigoku 無間地獄 Hell of Avici.
Buddhist Hell of "Uninterrupted, Eternal Torment"


. kane 鐘 bell, temple bell - Introduction .

There are various temples in Japan who claim this bell.

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- quote -
Keisei Dôjôji - Mugen no Kane Shindôjôji 無間鐘新道成寺
"Keisei Dôjôji"
is a variation of the famous dance "Musume Dôjôji" (created in 1753) about a young girl who is rejected by a priest. He flees from her and hides under the bell at Dôjôji Temple. She pursues him and in her rage transforms into a serpent, which wraps itself around the bell. The bell is destroyed and the priest is fried to a crisp!


In "Keisei Dôjôji",
the girl did not transform herself into a serpent, but rather appeared as Katsuragi, a beautiful, high-ranking courtesan, thereby reflecting the close relationship between Kabuki and the pleasure quarters at the beginning of the 18th century when "Keisei Dôjôji" was created.
The story included a parallel tradition that the person who strikes the bell during life will be visited with unlimited wealth, but on death they will suffer unlimited torment in hell.
The courtesan describes her life and emotions in the pleasure quarters, which was like being lost in dark clouds of passion, as well as her punishment in hell, which she says is a forest of tightly packed swords through which souls are relentlessly pursued and their flesh cut to shreds. She has now come to pray to the bell that has caused her so much trouble. Hoping that her prayers will clear away her burden of sin, the spirit of the courtesan disappears.
- Courtesy of Jean Wilson (1999)
- reference source : kabuki21.com... -

. Anchin and Kiyohime 安珍・清姫 - 道成寺 Dojo-Ji .

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Hirakana Seisuiki "The Soundless Bell"


The story of the lovers 梅枝 Umegae and Genta.

Mugen no Kane 無限の鐘 The legendary Bell of Hell.
The person who strikes this bell becomes immensely rich in this world but will go directly to hell after his/her death to suffer eternally.
In Kabuki, many dances were created based on this legend and in association with the world of courtesans, always desperately helping their lover in need of money and ready to sacrifice themselves by striking the Bell of Hell. Nowadays, the only surviving mugen no kane scene is part of one act of the epic drama "Hirakana Seisuiki", commonly called "Mugen no Kane" or "Kanzaki Ageya".
- source : kabuki21.com...-


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Umegae muken no mane 梅が枝無間の真似
Parody of Umegae Striking the Bell of Limitless Hell

歌川国義 Utagawa Kuniyoshi


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. ume ga e utau 梅が枝うたう Umegae, Poetry for plum branches .
kigo for the New Year

- quote -
Umegae 梅枝
A pictorial subject based on "A Branch of Plum" Umegae, Chapter 32 of
GENJI MONOGATARI 源氏物語 (The Tale of Genji).


In the chapter,
Genji's household is preparing for the coming of age ceremony of the princess who will become the Akashi Empress (明石). On the tenth day of the Second Month Genji holds a competition to determine the incense she will use at court. He gathers scents from several people and calls on Prince Hotaru (Hotaru Hyoubunokyou 蛍兵部卿) to judge them. The scene most frequently chosen for illustration shows Genji and Prince Hotaru looking at two jars sent by Princess Asagao (朝顔), one indigo with a pine branch, one white with a plum branch from which most of the blossoms have fallen, and to which she has attached a poem. The Crown Prince also has his coming of age ceremony in this chapter.
In the Third Month the third daughter of the Minister of the Left (the third in rank of the three main ministers of state, below the Minister of the Right and the Prime Minister) is presented at court, while the Akashi Princess is presented in the Fourth Month.
At this time Tou no Chuujou 頭中将 (To no Chujo, here called the "Palace Minister", or Naidaijin 内大臣) begins to reconcile himself to the love between Yuugiri 夕霧, Genji's son, and his daughter Kumoi no kari 雲井雁.
- source : JAANUS -


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source : mfa.org/collections...Denman Waldo Ross Collection..

Ukiyo tokei Muken no kane 浮世とけいむけんのかね
A Floating World Clock as the Bell of Muken

Gakô Senkadô 西村重長 Nishimura Shigenaga (1697 - 1756)


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source : mfa.org/collections... William Sturgis Bigelow Collection...

Mitate Muken no kane zu 見立無間鐘図 Parody of Muken no Kane
川又常行 Kawamata Tsuneyuki (1677 - ?)

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- - - - - Once upon a time


- reference source : ochakaido.com/rekisi/mukashi... -

At the time of 聖武天皇 Emperor Shomu Tenno (around 730)
there lived an Immortal, 仙人, in the village of 菊川村 Kikugawa in Shizuoka.
He prayed every day to 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O and then went to the village for alms. After this, he rang the bell at the top of 粟ヶ岳 Mount Awagatake 淡ヶ嶽.
This bell could be heard all over the 遠州 Enshu region (now Shizuoka). Each ring had a special prayer wish:

一つつけば、事故や災難をまぬがれ、one - prevent accidents and disasters
二つつけば、病気にならず、- two - do not become ill
三つつけば、家内安全、- three - peace and well-being at home
四つつけば、運が開けて出世する、- four - find good luck for your business life
五つつけば、子宝に恵まれ、- five - be blessed with children
六つつけば、幸運がつづき、- six - may good luck continue
七つつけば、大金持ちになる、- seven - may you become rich

and so on for each ring.
The villagers climbed up to the temple to participate from these good prayers.
But the path to the temple was steep and narrow, and in their hurry they pushed and some fell into the ravine, some even died.
When the head priest saw all this, he decided to exclude the villagers from the prayers of the Immortal and threw the bell into the deep well.
This became known to our day as
"mugen no ido" 無間の井戸 "the endless well", "eternal well" at the top of Mount Awagatake.




Muken no Kane is 遠州七不思議 one of the seven wonders of Enshu. at 無間山観音寺 Mukenzan Kannon Temple.

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Daimugenzan 大無間山 is a mountain in Shizuoka.



- Read a long legend here:
. The perpetual life-giving wine and sennin heavenly immortals of Mt. Daimugenzan .
- - - - - excerpted from ANCIENT TALES AND FOLK-LORE OF JAPAN by Richard Gordon Smith [1918]


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at 瀬戸内海 - 塩飽本島 Setonaikai Shiwaki Honjima Island
極楽寺 Temple Gokuraku-Ji, at the 観音堂 Kannon-Do hall

The temple has the family graves of the 丸尾家 Maruo Clan.
The temple bell relates to the story of 丸尾五左衛門 Maruo Gozaemon, a former Samurai turned very rich merchant of the Edo period.


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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


. abi jigoku 阿鼻地獄 / 無間地獄 Avīci, Buddhist Hell of Avici .
is called 無間地獄 "Mugen Jigoku".
... the hell of "Uninterrupted Torment" (Avici), where big dogs, pythons and monsters with many heads vomit volumes of flame to burn the sinners.
Avīci hell is also known as the "Mugen-Do, non-stop way" (無間道).


................................................................................. Nagano 長野県
佐久市 Saku city 野沢町 Nozawa

Near Nozawa town there lived a 長者 very rich man. Once he was involved in a law suit and wanted to win it. So he pledged to go to 高野山 Mount Koyasan to ring the bell Muken no Kane, if he won. He won the law suit, but after that misfortune continued, he lost more and more money and after his sudden death nobody of the family wanted to live in his mansion.


................................................................................. Niigata 新潟県
佐渡市 Sado city 相川町 Aikawa

hiru 蛭 leech
Around 1610 a person born in Tajima (Now Northern Hyogo) came to Aikawa and made a fortune in the gold mines of Sado. But he became very stingy and on the last day of the year went to the gold mine and slept there. His wife was at home preparing New Year food and wondered what to do about him. Then she remembered the lore about Muken no Kane. She pretended the grounding mortar was a bell and banged it with the pestle. From that day on the family became even richer and more gold was found in the mines.
Legend says that one can hit this bell only once in a lifetime for a positive wish. On the grave of such a person will be leeches for the next seven generations. And indeed, when her husband died, leeches showed up on his grave stone.


................................................................................. Shizuoka 静岡県
周智郡 Shuchi district 水窪町 Misakubo

hebi 蛇 serpent
Once a person went to a special riverside, オトボウ淵, to make a wish and then rung Muken no Kane. He soon became a very rich man. But after his death a serpent showed up at the riverside. If anyone wanted to approach the riverside, he had to hang some smartweed (Persicaria)around his hips for protection.


................................................................................. Wakayama 和歌山県
有田郡 Arida district 清水村 Shimizu

hiru 蛭 leech
Once a man rung the Muken no Kane and then became very rich.
But since then the soy been rice gruel the family eat on the fifth day of the New Year suddenly turned into very large leeches.

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日高郡 Hidaka district みなべ町 Minabe

To make a Muken no Kane people need a special clay and water, and then put inside it the statues of Ebisu and Daikoku when firing the pottery.
If during this process there was a huge sound, the wish was granted and the person became rich. But in reverse he had to promise to refrain from something he liked, for example not making special New Year food. One man even promised he would offer his body after this death to be eaten by the wolves.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database -

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Muken-no-kane
Fuga hibachi muken no kane uki-e kongen - The Elegant Brazier,
Sato nomi sao muken no kane goto
- reference : "muken no kane" kabuki -




source : traveljapanblog.com/wordpress...
muken jigoku 無間地獄 Hell of Incessant Suffering


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. Edo Culture via Ukiyo-E on Facebook .

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. Edo bakufu 江戸幕府 The Edo Government .

. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. Japanese Architecture - Interior Design - The Japanese Home .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


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- - - - - #mukennokane #umegae #genta #abijigoku - - - -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Edo - the EDOPEDIA - on 7/18/2017 09:56:00 am

SHRINES - Takayama Inari Tsugaru



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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
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Takayama Inari Jinja 高山稲荷神社 Takayama Inari Shrine, Aomori


青森県つがる市牛潟町鷲野沢147-1 / Washinosawa-147-2 Ushigatacho, Tsugaru, Aomori

- quote
Takayama Inari Shrine is famous throughout northern Japan and is revered as a very efficacious shrine for prayers dealing with maritime safety, bountiful harvests, and business prosperity.
Its seemingly innumerable line of red torii gates is spectacular with the gates' curves and twists being likened to those of a dragon.
The shrine is dedicated to the god Inari, a popular deity among Japanese shrines, the most famous being the Fushimi Inari Shrine in Kyoto.
Every year, the shrine attracts many visitors during its Grand Spring Festival and during the New Year's holidays.
- source : city.tsugaru.aomori.jp...


高山稲荷神社【つがる市】
屏風山のちょうど真ん中に位置しています。神社のすぐ裏は七里長浜となっています。伏見稲荷神社と同じ稲荷大神が祭られており、五穀豊穣・海上安全・商売繁盛の神様として、青森随一の霊験あらたかな神社で、千本鳥居は、圧巻です。
- reference source : t-ate.com/archives... -


. Inari Matsuri 稲荷祭 Fox Shrine Festivals .




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shuin 朱印 stamp





引退した祠がずらりと並ぶ - 小神祠公園


Inari fox statues from all over Tohoku are "retired" here in a special park.


Old small shrines from all over Tohoku are "retired" here in a special park.

- - - - -  HP of the Shrine
- source : bqspot.com/tohoku/aomori -


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- Reference : 高山稲荷神社
- Reference : English


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .


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- #takayamainari #tsugarutakayama -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Japan - Shrines and Temples on 7/22/2017 10:52:00 am

29 Jun 2017

SHRINE - Amewakahiko


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. kami 神 Shinto deities - Introduction .
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Amewakahiko, Ame-Waka-Hiko 天若日子 / 天稚彦  / あめわかひこ
Ame wakahiko / Ame no wakahiko




- quote -
The child of Amatsukunitama. In preparation for the Descent of the Heavenly Grandchild (tenson kōrin), Amenohohi was first sent from the Plain of High Heaven to the residence of the earth kami Ōkuninushi, to pacify the Central Land of Reed Plains and engage in negotiations for its transfer to the Heavenly Grandchild. Amenohohi did not return, however, with the result that Amenowakahiko was entrusted with bow and arrow from the heavenly kami, and dispatched with the same mission. According to Kojiki, this appointment was at the recommendation of Omoikane, while Nihongi states that it was at the recommendation of all the heavenly kami.

Amewakahiko, however, took to wife Shitateruhime, the daughter of Ōkuninushi, and made plans to rule himself over the Central Land. Like his predecessor, Amewakahiko sent no report back to the Plain of High Heaven, with the result that Takamimusuhi and others convened a council of the heavenly kami; upon deliberation, they decided to dispatch the pheasant Nakime to inquire of Amewakahiko's true intentions. But Amawakahiko, urged on by Amenosagume, used the bow and arrow received from the heavenly kami to shoot the pheasant Nakime. The arrow pierced Nakime and continued to climb to heaven where it was found by Takamimusuhi; discerning the false heart of Amewakahiko, he flung the arrow back down at the Central Land where it struck Amewakahiko mortally in the breast.
Nihongi records that at the time he was killed, Amewakahiko was resting after observing the festival of first fruits (Niinamesai), while Kojiki states that he was lying in bed one morning. The histories relate that this event was the origin of the maxim, "fear a returning arrow," and the story is also touched upon in the "norito for the exorcism of a vengeful deity" (Tataru kami utsushiyarau).

Amewakahiko's name is mentioned in the fragmentary records of the Settsu no kuni fudoki, the Utsubo monogatari, Sagoromo monogatari, as well as the later Otogi zōshi. His name appears to have been widely used as a generic reference to male deities who descended from heaven to earth.
Deities called Amewakahiko are worshiped at some shikinaisha in the province of Izumo.
- source : Mori Mizue 2005 - Kokugakuin -

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- quote -
A Demon in the Sky:
The Tale of Amewakahiko, a Japanese Medieval Story

By Reider, Noriko T.

In most cultures demons and dragons reside at the heart of the supernatural, where their distinct status reflects their various cultural roles. This is also true of Japanese culture and folklore, where these creatures play prominent roles.
For present-day Japanese, oni (demons or ogres) typically reside in Buddhist hell to punish mortal sinners, but for their medieval counterparts, the oni's role and the space oni occupied were much more flexible. Perhaps a prime example of this is Amewakahiko söshi (Tale of Amewakahiko; fifteenth century), a fictional story that recounts one legendary origin of Tanabata (Festival of the Weaver, the Star Festival), the celebration of the annual meeting of the Weaver Maid and the Cowherd, who represent the stars Vega and Altair, respectively. In this version of the Tanabata story, an oni is standing in the beautiful serene sky. This oni turns out to be the father of a kairyüö (Kairyu-O, a dragon king of the ocean) who also lives in the sky. This dragon king calls himself Amewakahiko (sometimes Amewakamiko), hence the title.

The plot of The Tale of Amewakahiko
is similar to "Cupid and Psyche" by Lucius Apuleius (second century CE). Some scholars in Japan recognize "Cupid and Psyche" as the source of The Tale of Amewakahiko, and others read the dragon king's tale as indigenous to Japan. Although there is no finally persuasive evidence that the Japanese tale was influenced by "Cupid and Psyche," it is worthwhile to examine the Apuleian tale's connection to The Tale of Amewakahiko and to share these different scholarly perspectives from Japan in an English-language publication. Thus in this essay I discuss the various possible origins of the tale. Thinking of The Tale of Amewakahiko in a Japanese folkloric and literary context reveals a specifically medieval Japanese view of space boundaries (or lack thereof) of underground, earth, and heaven that oni and a dragon travel; it also suggests that studies of ancient and classical Japanese literature (periods of ancient and classical literature, 645-1185 CE) by medieval Japanese scholars influenced the choice of the characters' names and their actions in this tale.



--- Plot and Genre of The Tale of Amewakahiko
One day a huge serpent appears in front of a wealthy family's house. The serpent demands one of the family's three daughters for his wife or, he threatens, he will destroy the whole family. The two older daughters refuse, but the youngest daughter consents. A huge house is built near a pond as part of the wedding preparations requested by the serpent, and there, alone, she awaits her snake husband. When the gigantic serpent appears, he asks the girl to cut off his head. As she does so, a handsome, young gentleman appears, and they live happily in their newly built house. After a while, the husband reveals his true identity as a dragon king of the ocean and tells the girl that he must go to the sky to do some business. He tells her how to find him in the sky if he does not come back. He then orders her not to open a certain treasure chest-if the chest is opened, he tells her, he will not be able to return to earth. While he is away, her two older sisters visit her and become jealous of her wealth and happiness. They open the treasure chest from which only smoke arises. When the girl learns that her husband cannot return anymore, she goes to Kyoto as instructed by her husband before he left and buys a gourd whose vine grows to the sky in one night.

Climbing the vine up to the sky, the girl journeys in search of her husband, whose name, the reader has learned, is Amewakahiko (or Amewakamiko). With great difficulty, she finally finds him. Although they are happy together, Amewakahiko expresses his concern that if his father, an oni, becomes aware of her, there could be trouble. So whenever his father visits him, the dragon king changes his wife into a pillow or fan. But the secret is finally revealed one day, and the oni-father takes her away and imposes on her four difficult tasks. …
- source : questia.com/library/journal -

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - Index - .

. Ryuu-oo 竜王 Ryu-O - The Dragon King .


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Amewakahiko Jinja 天稚彦神社 Shrine Amewakahiko



Built during the 戦国時代 Period of the Warring States by 高野瀬氏 Lord Takanose to protect his castle, the town and his people.
Many people come here on the 17th of each month to celebrate and attend rituals.

- reference : 天稚彦神社 -


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Amewakahiko Sooshi, sōshi 天稚彦草子 Amewakahiko Soshi scroll
Scroll of the Tale of Amewakahiko

painter: Tosa Hirochika (Japanese, c. 1439-1492)







- reference source : amewakahiko soshi -

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Klassische Weisheiten aus Japan: Mit der Bilderrolle 'Amewakahiko no soshi'
Kurzer, Michael

Beim Büchlein "Klassische Weisheiten aus Japan" handelt es sich um eine äußerst überschaubare Sammlung von japanischen Sprichwörtern, Märchen und poetischen und religiösen Texten. Dazwischen sorgt die Bilderrolle "Amewakahiko no soushi" des Malers Fujiwara Tosa Hirokane für Abwechslung.
source : japaninfo.at/news/buch


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- Reference : 天稚彦 / アメノワカヒコ
- Reference : Amewakahiko


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

. Tanabata 七夕 The Star Festival .


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- #amewakahiko #amenowakahiko -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Japan - Shrines and Temples on 6/24/2017 01:28:00 pm

TENGU - Tengu from Chichibu


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
- for Oni from Chichibu, see below.
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Chichibu no Tengu 秩父の天狗さま The Tengu from Chichibu


- Chichibu-Tama-Kai National Park -

The mountainous Chichibu region of Saitama is close to Tokyo, yet full of local lore and color.

. Chichibu Yomatsuri 秩父夜祭 Night Festival .

. Mitsumine Jinja 三峰神社 Shrine and Wolf Legends .

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- quote
Chichibu - By Sumiko Enbutsu
Tengu Matsuri in November
O-Tengu-Sama (Folk Kabuki) at Kidama Jinja, Tsuyagi
Tengu-ya (noodle shop)
..... Legends abound in rural areas of mysterious happenings attributed to Tengu: chopping sounds at midnight, as if trees were being felled .....
- source : books.google.co.jp/books


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In Chichibu, the Tengu is seen as a
mountain deity, Tengu-Shin 天狗神 Tengu-Kami, Tengu God.

- quote -
A later version of the Kujiki (? Kojiki), an ancient Japanese historical text, writes the name of Amanozako,
a monstrous female deity born from the god Susanoo's spat-out ferocity, with characters meaning
tengu deity (天狗神).
The book describes Amanozako as a raging creature capable of flight, with the body of a human, the head of a beast, a long nose, long ears, and long teeth that can chew through swords. An 18th-century book called the Tengu Meigikō (天狗名義考) suggests that this goddess may be the true predecessor of the tengu, but the date and authenticity of the Kojiki, and of that edition in particular, remain disputed.
- source : wikipedia -


Amanozako 天逆毎(あまのざこ)Goddess of Tengu
- quote -
... she is a female, she is a god, she has a son. Her nicknames reveal how rare those things are: metengu (woman tengu) and tengu kami (tengu god) refer specifically to her; i.e. there aren't really other female tengu or tengu gods besides her.



I also think she is interesting because while most tengu are considered to be malicious demons lurking in the forests, she is actually revered as a goddess. While it isn't terribly uncommon to see shrines dedicated to tengu or small tengu cults (think of Sojobo from a few days ago), Amanozako's story is special in that she interacts with the other gods in heaven. Her myths are not self-contained stories, but play off of the larger pantheon. She was supposedly born out of a chunk of spit and gall that the temperamental storm god, Susanoo, vomited up. Most tengu don't have that as a claim to fame!
- source : yokai.com/amanozako -

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. reference by Toyota Toki とよた 時 / 画房【とよだ 時】 Toyoda Toki .
Manga Painter of Satoyama Japan

In Chichibu, the Tengu is seen as a mountain deity, Tengu-Shin 天狗神 Tengu-Kami.


Kokushidake no Tengu-Iwa 国師岳の天狗岩 Tengu Rock, Tengu Boulder
奥秩父 Oku-Chichibu
Mount Kokushidake is 2591 m high.
Oku Chichibu is located along the border of Saitama, Yamanashi and Nagano. Connecting Nagano and Chichibu is the pass Oodarumi Tooge 大弛峠 Odarumi Pass.

Near Kokushidake is the Tengu One 国師ヶ岳天狗尾根 "Tengu Mountain Ridge", with the Tengu Rock formation. In former times there was the Oku no In Mountain Shrine of 大岳山那賀都神社 Daidakesan Nagato Jinja from Yamanashi (former 三富村 Mitomimura). On top of the rocks is an iron sword, the ご神体 image of the deity.
The formation of the rocks is said to look just like the profile of a Tengu, with a long nose.

Mount Kokushidake was named after priest Musoo Kokushi 夢窓国師 Muso Kokushi.
Around 1330 Muso Kokushi stayed in Yamanashi, 塩山 Enzan at the temple 乾徳山恵林寺 Erin-Ji to make a temple garden (he was a specially gifted garden designer).
The mountain name 大岳山 Daidakesan (Oodakesan) also refers to him.

. Muso Kokushi Soseki 夢窓疎石 (1275 - 1351) .





The deity venerated at this mountain peak is 大山祇神 (おおやまづみのかみ Ooyamazumi no Kami.

. - Ooyamatsuminomikoto 大山祇神, 大山積神, 大山津見神 Oyama Tsumi no Mikoto .

The peak is also venerated by Buddhists, who chant the following when climbing the mountain to pray for good business and protection of the silk industry:
南無大岳那賀都の神社、大山の神、高岡の神、六根清浄.
Namu Daidake Nagato no Jinja , Oyama no Kami, Takaoka no Kami, Rokkon Shojo.



- reference : toki.moo.jp/gaten/251-300/gate264 -

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nokkinboo 破風山のノッキン坊天狗 Nokkinbo Tengu, Nokkin-Bo
ニョッキンボウ Nyokkin-Bo

at Mount Happusan 破風山, 601 m high, Mount Happu, Minano, Saitama.



At the temple 水潜寺 Suisen-Ji, Nr. 34 of the Chichibu Pilgrimage to 34 Kannon Temples, Nokkin-Bo Tengu is venerated as a protector deity.
Nokkin-Bo is ibo no Kami イボの神, a deity to take away warts. The local people came here to worship, bringing some Sake rice wine in bamboo containers. Even nowadays, a lot of "Cup Sake" is offered here.

. 秩父三十四観音霊場 Pilgrimage to 34 Chichibu Kannon Temples .

. ibotori 疣取り / イボ取り / いぼとり take away warts .
ibogamisan いぼ神さん Shinto deity to take away warts / ibotori san いぼとりさ

- reference : toki.moo.jp/inaka-jo/04tengu/15chichib -


- - - - - Closely related to Knokkin-Bo is
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Ryookamisan no Tori Tengu 両神山の刀利天狗 Ryokamisan

Mount Ryokamisan, at the northern end of the Okuchichibu Mountains, is 1,723 m high.
Until recently, women were forbidden to climb this sacred mountain up to the Shrine at its top.



Legend knows that En no Gyoja was the first to climb up here.

Ryookami means "two deities". Here they are
イザナギ(伊弉諾)Izanagi and イザナミ(伊弉冉 Izanami.
. Izanagi 伊弉諾 - 伊弉冉尊and Izanami 伊邪那美命 .

Also known as 八日見山 Yokamiyama, 竜頭山 Ryukamiyama (Dragon Head) and 鋸岳 Nokogiridake.
The name Yokamiyama dates back to Yamato Takeru, who 見 looked this mountain for 八日 eight days when he climbed Mount Tsukuba .
. Yamato Takeru 日本武尊 - Introduction .

The name Ryukami is a pun on the writing 竜神 Dragon God. This deity is known for its eight heads ヤオカミ Yaokami - Yokami.

This mountain is also related to the Tengu
. 六尺坊 Rokushakubo, Rokushaku-Bo .
from Mount 御嶽山 Ontakesan in Kiso.
Other Tengu who live here are
前山 - 三笠山 刀利天坊 Mikasayama - Toriten-Bo
前山 - 八海山 大頭羅坊 Hakkaisan - Daizura-Bo
(摩利支天山 Marishiten Yama) on 阿留摩耶山 the peak Arumayasan アルマヤ坊 Arumaya-Bo

- reference : toki.moo.jp/inaka-jo/04tengu -

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Ryookami Jinja 両神神社 Ryokami Shrine
About half-way up to the summit.


source and more photos : ridgelineimages.com/hiking...

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

Tengoo matsuri 天狗祭(テンゴー祭り) Tengo (Tengu) Festival
Tengu is seen as yama no kami 山の神 a Deity of the Mountain
During the festival people pray for safety while working in the mountain forest and blessings for the family.
The main actors of this festival are children.

原の天狗まつり Hara no Tengu Matsuri
秩父市荒川白久(原区)地内 In Hara village



This festival was held in many parts of Chichibu, but now only in the Hara village.
The young boys collect wood, bamboo and leaves to prepare for a huge ritual bonfire.
The sounds of the huge fire,
パチパチ、パンパン、バリバリ pachi pachi, pan pan, pari pari
The Tengo sama is venerated as Hibuse no Kami 火防の神 Deity to prevent fire, also as the Yama no Kami 山の神 Deity of the Mountain and the pillow of this Tengo is on top of the mountain.
- reference source : navi.city.chichibu.lg.jp -

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There are a few legends about sacred trees where the Tengu sits and takes a rest -
Tengu no matsu 天狗の松, Tengu no koshikake matsu 天狗の腰掛松.
People protect these trees and dear not cut them down for fear of bad luck and misfortune.
For example in Chichibu town, Higashi-Chichibu, Ogano, ...

Tengu no yasumi no ki 天狗の休み木 A tree where the Tengu takes a rest
Along the pass 烏首峠 Torikubi Toge, which connects 名栗 Naguri with 浦山 Urayama in Chichibu there is 大楓 a huge maple tree where the Tengu takes a rest.
When the forest workers cut it down, there begun a lot of accidents to happen, a wood cutter fell ill and eventually even the man who bought the lumber was hit with bad luck.

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Until the end of WWII, the Tengu were still quite acitve in Chichibu.
At night, people heard the sounds of someone cutting trees in a valley or rolling boulders around a river. When they looked the next morning, all was the same as before ant not one tree felled.
When the Tengu got angry, he would cause fires and make strange noises. Even his horrible laughter could be heard.
The wood workers and fishermen would offer ritual Sake to the Tengu before starting to work.
Once a worker said something bad about the Tengu, but on this day he fell into a ravine and hurt himself.

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At the back of Shrine 和田神社 Wada Jinja was a sanctuary for the 愛宕様 Atago Deity, the 山の神 God of the Mountain.
Once a young man went up there on the 17th night of the second lunar month to meet the Tengu. He saw his huge legs, but could not see the head.

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Tengu-Iwa 天狗岩 and Waterfall


There was a Tengu Boulder near the waterfall 七代の滝 Nanayo no Taki, where a Tengu lived. Once a priest from the nearby temple used it to pee.
If the visitors in his temple wanted to eat Tofu from Tokoy, the Tengu went off to fetch it in no time.

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kawatengu 川天狗 Tengu becoming a River

A huge flood in the region is called Kawa Tengu.
Once during a huge flood the sacred tree for the Tengu was swept away and something red could be seen floating downwriver. Even a huge boulder floating down was split into two, took the shape of two Tengu and was washed away in no time.

- - - - - And a legend from 大滝村 Otaki village
Once a farmer threw his net into the pond at the bottom of the waterfall and caught about 15 trout fish. When he thew his net a second time, be pulled out a sparkle of silver light and a fearful loud voice from the bottom of the pond shouted:
"The first time I forgive you , but a second time is not allowed!"
This time the Kawa Tengu, the River Tengu was angry. (In other legends, the "Kawa Tengu" is seen as a Kappa.)

. kawatengu, kawa-tengu, kawa tengu 川天狗 "river Tengu" .

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東秩父村 Higashi Chichibu

Once upon a time
the Tengu from 武甲山 Mount Bukozan (Bukosan, Mount Buko 1,304 m) and 笠山 Mount Kasayama (837 m) competed about the hight of their mountains.
The Tengu from Bukozan scooped water in a barrel and let it flow toward Kasayama. The angry Tengu from Kasayama took a traveler's hat (kasa 笠), placed it below the barrel and let the water flow back to Bukozan.

Once upon a time
the villagers from 白石 Shiraishi were re-doing a roof with reeds, because when it rained, the roof was leeking. So they kept busy cutting reeds. Just at that time in a nearby farm house, they had just put up reeds for drying. And then - what do you know - in one night all the reeds were over to the neighbour's roof, while they heard strange sounds, ガヤガヤ gayagaya al night.
Next morning the farmer wanted to get his reeds back, but then he realized that only a Tengu could do all that work in one night and returned home in fear.

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倉尾村 Kurao

The Tengu from Kurao
often launch a firework from their rock called 天狗岩 Tenguiwa. But it does not make a sound at all, just beautiful colors like chrysanthemums in the sky.

Once upon a time
a woodworker slipped and fell in a ravine, but a Tengu caught him and helped him.

Once upon a time,
a young man was kidnapped by the Tengu. After three years he came back, but he could do nothing, only blowing the flute.

Once upon a time
a farmer went harvesting rye and took his son with him. But the son was kidnapped by the Tengu. They later found him asleep under a tree, remembering nothing.

Once upon a time
a farmer heard the sound of voices, ホイホイ hoihoi, cutting down a tree. The next morning he found his saw broken.
.
yama no kami 山の神 - Tengu Matsu Pine
Near the Shrine are some trees with abnormal appearance, too thick or very bumpy. They are also called yama no kami no ki 山ノ神の木 "Trees of the Mountain Deity".

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皆野町 Minano

Once a young boy did not come home from school. At night they all went out to search for him they found him on the largest tree, high up in the branches.

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小鹿野町 Ogano

- Tengu no iwa 天狗の岩 Tengu Rock / Tengu boulder
Once upon a time
a skilful fisherman and woodworker lived in the village. One day he forgot to offer ritual Sake to the Tengu before starting to work. He even said something bad about the Tengu.
While he was busy, the sky suddenly turned dark with clouds and rumbling. Then a huge boulder came falling from the sky and burried everything under it, the workers and the lumber - such is the revenge of the Tengu.

Once upon a time
the village temple went out of business and the 釣り鐘 temple bell was given to the pawn shop. It was sold to another village, where soon a fire started. The local fortune teller said it was the temple bell bringing bad luck, so it was given back. This legend is called
Tengu-sama no tsurigane 天狗様の釣り鐘 the Temple bell of the Tengu.

. bonshoo 梵鐘 Bonsho, temple bell - Introduction .

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大滝村 Otaki

tengusama no ki 天狗様の木 The tree of the Tengu
When they cut it down, blood was flowing from the cut.

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両神村 Ryokami village

kamikakushi 神かくし kidnapped !
A little girl of 3 years went to the mountain forest with her mother, but the girl lost her way. She was found 3 days later, more than 4 km away. She must have walked a way impossible to walk for such a yuong girl, so they say she was kidnapped by a Tengu.

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寄居町 Yorii

yama no kami 山の神 - 天狗松 Tengu-Matsu
At the pass toward Higashi-Chichibu village, the Deity of the Mountain is venerated at the Tengu Pine.
But one day the huge tree was to be cut down. But however much they hacked at it, it would not fall. So the workers rested for a while. While they sat down, the tree fell on them all by itself and hurt the workers badly. This was the curse of the Mountain God.


source : choichi.cocolog-nifty.com/blog...
Tengu-Matsu at 牛伏山 Ushibuseyama, Gunma

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吉田町 Yoshida

Once upon a time, it was customary for the local craftsmen to drink a cup of the when they had finished work and were on their way home.
There was one 畳屋 Tatami straw mat maker, who went home without drinking his tea.
After walking for a short while, he heard the sound of cutting wood and it became so dark he could not see the road. Unable to proceed he went back to borrow 提灯 a lantern.
The home owner told him this was the trick of the local Tengu. When he walked back again, it was so light, he almost did not need a lantern.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - Index - .

- - - - - Chichibu no Oni 秩父の鬼 Demon Legends from Chichibu - - - - -

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東秩父村 Higashi Chichibu

Once an Oni went to the village to catch a human to eat. He shape-shifted into a woman and tried to seduce a man, but the man held on to the branche of a tree and finally escaped.
When the Oni realist his pray was gone, he went right after him. But at the home of the man it smelled like 菖蒲とよもぎ iris and mugwort. The Oni can not stand this smell and run off very fast.
During the celebrations for 端午の節句 Setsubun, the Boy's Festival on March 5 people hang Iris and Mugwort from the eaves of their roofs to ward off the Demons.

. oni wa soto 鬼は外 "Demons, get out!" - Setsubun .

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小鹿野町 Ogano

Once in the deep mountains there lived a strong Oni. Every day he came down to the village and caused trouble, scolding the priest and digging up the fields.
The priest consulted with the cleverest men in the village, about what to do. They found a ruse, telling the Oni that humans were much stronger than he and eventually the Oni left.
(This legend is also told in other villages.)

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Oni yarai 秩父神社の鬼やらい Driving out the Demons at Chichibu Shrine - Setsubun
. Onibabari 鬼払い driving out the demons, .



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秩父の鬼うどん Chichibu no Oni Udon Noodle Restaurant / 定峰峠の鬼うどん
Chichibu District, Higashichichibu, Shiroishi, 333 - Sadamine Toge Pass

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. . . CLICK here for Photos !
- reference - 秩父 天狗-
- reference - tengu from chichibu -

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. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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--
Posted By Gabi Greve to Kappa - The Kappapedia on 6/26/2017 10:12:00 am

24 Jun 2017

SHRINE - Aoni Jinja hamlet Nagano Zenki


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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Aoni shuuraku 青鬼集落 a hamlet named Aoni "Green Demon"
Aoni Hokujō, Hakuba-mura, Kitaazumi-gun, Nagano / 長野県北安曇郡白馬村北城
(はくばむらあおに)Hakubamura Aoni, Aoni settlement
and
Ozenkisama お善鬼様 O-Zenki Sama



The hamlet is famous for its old farm houses and the spectacular view of Mount Hakuba, the "White Horse".
There are only 15 old houses in the hamlet.

Near the hamlet are remains from settlements of the 縄文時代 Jomon period, named
善鬼堂遺跡 Zenkido and 馬場遺跡 Baba.
The present-day settlement is from the late Edo period till Meiji.
The complicated water canals for the rice fields are called Aoni seki 青鬼堰 weirs from Aoni.

The whole hamlet is a special
重要伝統的建造物群保存地区 - Conservation district of traditional buildings



旅するTZRの文化財撮影記
source : takashitzr.blog62.fc2.com


When the terraced rice fields are full of water in early summer, the mountain range is reflected in the water.




On a very lucky morning in early summer, there is a "Red Hakuba" reflected in the water.


source : 自然風景写真・鏡花水月

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- quote -
Aoni Rice Terraces 青鬼棚田
The terraces are made with stone walls.



There are also well-preserved Kayabuki (thatched) Roof Houses that were built during the period between Edo period to Meiji period in Aoni settlement.
You can have glorious views of Hakuba`s mountain range and Japanese landscape of the Rice Terraces.
There are no restaurants or souvenir shops in the Aoni Rice Settlement.
It is to protect the serene life of the inhabitants of the village.
5 km from Hakuba Station.
- source : veryjapanese.jp/places/aoni-rice-terraces -


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Aoni Jinja 青鬼神社(Aooni Jinja ) Aoni Shrine

Located in the North of the hamlet, built in the Early Meiji period.
The deity in residence is 善鬼大明神 Zenki Daimyojin (御善鬼様 O-Zenki Sama)



On the right is a small shrine:
Suwa Yashiro 諏訪社.

Preparations for the annual festival are made in O-Zenki no Yakata.
himomi no shinji 「火揉みの神事」making fire for the Gods
The villagers make fire themselves and light lanterns as offerings for the shrine.
Later there is a firework in the village.

ー Look at a video of the shrine here:
- source : youtube.com/watch -


. Shinto shrine names including 鬼 ONI .


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- reference source : -
Mt. Shirouma (白馬岳 Shirouma-dake) - Shirouma is another reading for Hakuba, "White Horse".
is a peak in the Hida Mountains range of the Japanese Alps, located in Nagano Prefecture and Toyama Prefecture, central Honshu, Japan.
Mount Shirouma is the 26th-tallest mountain in Japan. At 2,932 metres (9,619 ft), it is the highest peak in the Hakuba section of the Hida Mountains, and one of the top "to climb" peaks for Japanese hikers. It is also one of the few peaks in Japan with year-round snow fields (Firn), in the Shirouma Dai Sekkei (白馬大雪渓), or Shirouma deep-snow gorge .
It is located within the Chūbu-Sangaku National Park.
Mount Shirouma is one of the landmark 100 Famous Japanese Mountains.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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お善鬼様伝説 The Legend of O-Zenki Sama - The Benevolent Demon
Further away to the North-East of Aoni hamlet is 岩手山 Mount Iwatesan. East of Mount Iwatesan is 戸隠村 Togakushi village and the village of
鬼無里村 Kinasa Mura, "Village without Demons".
Once upon a time there came a giant man to Kinasa, the "Village without Demons", and caused a lot of trouble. The villagers pulled together and confined the giant man into a hole near the bottom of Mount Iwatesan. A while later a traveller told the villagers that a giant man had appeared in Togakushi and helped the people there. He had passed through a kind of tunnel in the mountains and come to the other side, on the way changing his evil manners and became a good and helpful person. The people now called him O-Zenki Sama.
The villagers built a shrine for him, calling him あおに Aoni instead of あおおに Aooni and later the Chinese characters 青鬼 were used to spell the name of the hamlet.
He is also venerated as
Zenki Daimyojin 善鬼大明神

. Togakushiyama no Oni 戸隠山の鬼 Demon from Mount Togakushi .
Nagano 長野県 上水内郡 Kamiminochi district 鬼無里村 Kinasamura village

. Togakushi Jinja 戸隠神社 Togakushi Shrine - Nagano .

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O-Zenki no Yakata お善鬼の館 Mansion of Zenki




長野県北安曇郡白馬村大字北城17641
The building belonged to the 降籏家 Furuhata Family, built in 1908.
It was built to suit the silk farming of the region, facing South, with a large space below the roof for the silk worms. It became useless and empty in 2005 and was then revived as the O-Zenki no Yakata, a kind of local museum to welcome visitors and introduce the village culture.


- reference source : garden-plat.net/matinami/twon -
- reference source : siro.sitemix.jp/nagano/aoni -
- reference source : geocities.co.jp/MusicStar-Live -


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Near the village are groups of Stone Buddha statues,
「向麻石仏群」Mukasso and 「阿弥陀堂石仏群」Amidado.

There are also many Dosojin 道祖神, a speciality of the Azumi region.



.道祖神 Dosojin, Dososhin - Wayside Gods .

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北安曇郡 Kita Azumi District 小谷村 Otari village

ozenkisama お善鬼様 O-Zenki Sama
Near the village is a 高原 highland and there is a 岩穴 boulder with a hole. The people from 戸石 Toishi came here to borrow zenwan 膳椀 trays and bowls. A supernatural being, the "Benevlent Demon" would bring the items and the villagers had to bring them back clean after using them for special gatherings with large crowds, like weddings and funerals.
One day a villager did not bring them back and since then, they were never borrowed again.

In other regions there are the same legends, very often a Kappa or a Tengu brings the goods.
. Zenwanbuchi 膳椀淵 "river pool for trays and bowls" .
and Kappa Legends




. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .


- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -

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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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Posted By Gabi Greve to Kappa - The Kappapedia on 6/22/2017 09:45:00 am