Showing posts with label Shrine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shrine. Show all posts

5 Feb 2017

SHRINES - Kaitei Underwater Shrine and Susaki




[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
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Kaitei Jinja 海底神社 Underwater Shrine, Chiba
千葉県館山市「波左間海中公園」 / Tateyama town, Hasama Underwater Park



This shrine is located under water in Hasama Underwater Park, about 600 meters from the beach, at an underwater elevation called 高根 Takane.

The building is about 3.5 m high. The Torii gate is about 18 meters deep in the water.
The shrine building is 12 meters deep in the water.
To visit the shrine, people need diving equipment.

It is a sub-shrine of 洲崎神社 Susaki Jinja and was constructed with the wish and prayers to prevent water damage and accidents at sea by a local diving shop in July 1997.

The shimenawa しめ縄飾り sacred rope is made by the divers from plastic rope and renewed every year for the New Year rituals. The priest also has to use a diving suit to get there for the annual service.

It is said to be the only underwater shrine in Japan.
"日本で唯一の海底神社"


- - - - - HP of the underwater Shrine (水中神社)
- source : www5e.biglobe.ne.jp/~o_hasama/jinja -

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Susaki Jinja 洲崎神社 (Sunosaki Jinja)
千葉県館山市洲崎1697 / Chiba, Tateyama, Susaki (Suzaki)
洲宮神社 Sunomiya Jinja



It used to be the shrine 安房国一宮 Ichinomiya of Awa no Kuni.
It was built in 807.

- - - - - Deities in residence - - - - -
天比理乃咩命 Amenohirinome no Mikoto
formerly called 洲ノ神(すさきのかみ) Susaki no Kami (Sunosaki)
(天比理刀咩命 (あめのひりとめのみこと) Amenohiritome no Mikoto)


天太玉命(あめのふとだまのみこと)Amenofutodama no Mikoto
天富命(あめのとみのみこと)Amenotomi no Mikoto

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Taokihooi 手置帆負命 Taokihooi no kami
Ancestral kami (sojin) of the Inbe clan.
A kami related to the manufacture of shrine structures and implements. According to Kogo shūi, Taokihooi was ancestor of the Inbe of Sanuki (present-day Kagawa Prefecture). Together with Hikosashiri no mikoto, he was directed by Futodama (offspring of Takamimusuhi) to fabricate the "heavenly measures," "divine palace," and various military implements used to lure Amaterasu from the rock cave of heaven where she had hidden.

Under the leadership of Futodama's descendant Amenotomi no mikoto,
the descendants of Taokihooi and Hikosashiri no mikoto for the first time used sacred axes and adzes to cut mountain timber for the construction of Jinmu's main palace at Kashihara, and thereafter worked as fabricators of spear shafts. An "alternate writing" related by Nihongi states that in exchange for Ōmononushi's agreement to "transfer the land" (kuniyuzuri), Takamimusuhi vowed to provide Ōmononushi with eternal worship, and among the celebrants assigned to perform rites is listed one Taokihooi, ancestral kami of the Inbe of Kii (makers of sedge hats).
- source : Mori Mizue - kokugakuin -

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shuin 朱印 stamp





- - - - - HP of the Shrine
- source : sunosaki.info-

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Yearly Festivals 年中行事

The main Festival around August 20.
みのこ踊り奉納 Minoko Odori dance ritual


- CLICK for more photos !

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Cape Suno (洲崎 Suno-saki)
is a cape on the Pacific Ocean, in the city of Tateyama, Chiba Prefecture, Japan.
The cape is located at the southwestern point of Bōsō Peninsula on the island of Honshu, and marks the point between the inner and outer parts of the peninsula.
Cape Sunosaki is home to the Sunosaki Shrine, which was historically the supreme shrine (Ichinomiya) of Awa Province. By tradition it was built early in the Nara period.
The Sunosaki Shrine dance, the Sunosaki-odori, performed during religious observances at the shrine in June and August, is designated a national-level Intangible Cultural Property of Japan.
Yōrō-ji, a nearby Buddhist temple within the Sunosaki District of Tateyama, is historically closely linked with the Sunosaki Shrine.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

The tidal current at Sunomisaki is very fast and called 潮の道 "road of the sea". The fishermen are very afraid of this place.
The ghosts of shipwrecked fishermen come home along this path and all are afraid of this
ayashi no 怪しの潮路 "the mysterious tideway".

- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -


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There are other places called Susaki (Suzaki) or Sunosaki in Japan.

. Susaki Jinja 洲崎神社 - Aichi .

. Suzaki 洲崎 in Edo / Tokyo .
Suzaki Shiohigari 潮干狩 Shellfish gathering at low tide

. Wakanoura matsuri 和歌浦祭 - Wakayama .
... after the festival, the mikoshi palanquin was carried to Suzaki beach 須崎.


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .


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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

日の出見し洲崎の戻り初不動
hinode mishi Susaki no modori hatsu Fudo

back from the sunrise
at Sunomisaki -
first Fudo Ritual


中野三允 Nakano Sanin (1879 - 1955)
A disciple of Masaoka Shiki

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枯蘆を刈りて洲崎の廓哉
kareashi o karite susaki no kaku kana


正岡子規 Masaoka Shiki.



洲崎より柩出でゆく百日紅
鳥居美智子

ぎんなんの鈴生りの香を洲崎かな
いさ桜子

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[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #suichu #kaitei #underwatershrine #susaki #suzaki #sunosaki #susakichiba -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Japan - Shrines and Temples on 1/28/2017 01:06:00 pm

8 Jan 2017

SHRINES - komainu guardian dogs and lions


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
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komainu, koma-inu 狛犬 / 高麗犬 / 胡麻犬 "Korean Dog"
karajishi 唐獅子 "Chinese Lion"
foo dogs, fóshī 佛獅 Foshi


They come in a pair, one with its mouth open, agyoo 阿形;
and one with its mouth closed, ungyoo 吽形, thus representing the beginning (alpha) and end (omega) of all things.
Often a female one has one horn and the male one two.

. Komainu Daijin 狛犬大神 the Komainu Deity .
at 大和神社 Oyamato Shrine, Tenri, Nara

. koma...  狛 other Shrine guardian animals .

. Shiisa シーサー Lion Dogs from Okinawa.



source : facebook
Tokyo Asakusa Sanja Jinja 浅草『三社神社』 

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- quote -
komainu 狛犬 Lit. Korean dog.
A pair of lion-like guardian figures placed at each side of a shrine or temple entrance; believed to ward off evil spirits.
Thought to have been brought to Japan from China via Korea, their name is derived from Koma 高麗, the Japanese term for the Korean kingdom of Koguryo (Jp: Koukuri 高句麗). In the early Heian period, the two statues were clearly distinguished: the figure on the left, called shishi 獅子 (lion), resembled a lion with its mouth open agyou 阿形; the figure on the right, called komainu 狛犬 (Korean dog), resembled a dog with its mouth closed ungyou 吽形, and sometimes had a horn on its head.

- - - - - Ujigami Jinja Honden 宇治上神社本殿 (Kyoto)

Gradually
the term komainu came to be used for both statues, and their shapes became indistinguishable except for the open and closed mouths a-un 阿吽. In the Heian period komainu were used as weights or door-stops for curtains and screens in the Seiryoden 清涼殿, Kyoto Gosho 京都御所.
Other famous examples include a pair of painted wooden komainu (10-11c) at Yakushiji 薬師寺, Nara;
14 painted and lacquered wooden figures at Itsukushima Jinja 厳島神社 (12-14c) Hiroshima prefecture, and
the stone figures inside the south gate of Todaiji 東大寺, Nara, made by the 12c Chinese sculptor Chinnakei 陳和卿.
- source : JAANUS -

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Literally, "Korean lions," paired figures of lion tutelaries found at the entryway to shrine buildings, or alongside their torii or approachways.
Also written 高麗犬 or 胡麻犬.

Most are made of stone,
although bronze, iron, wood, and ceramic examples can also be found. The paired figures are typically male and female, and in some cases one of the two has horns. In generally, the pairs include one with an open mouth and one with mouth closed, the so-called a-un posture symbolizing the "alpha" and "omega" of the Sanskrit alphabet. In some pairs, however, both are depicted with open mouths. The origin of such tutelary beasts is said to go back to Egypt or India, but the ones transmitted to Japan originated during China's Tang dynasty.

Another style was introduced to Japan from Song China during the Kamakura period, and this style is frequently referred to as kara jishi (Chinese lions). The word "Koma" is an ancient term for the Korean peninsula, but since the images were merely transmitted through the Korean peninsula, it may be that the term Koma inu was merely used to indicate their "foreign" nature.
As tutelaries, the animals are believed to symbolize the eradication of evil and the protection of the area around the kami.
- source : Nakayama Kaoru - Kokugakuin -

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Join the Komainu Gallery on facebook for regular updates !

- - - - - Information by Hayato Tokugawa

FOO DOGS Part I
In the West they are often called "Foo Dogs";
however, they are not dogs, they're lions! It's a rather lazy Western contraction of the Chinese words
fóshī (佛獅, Buddha's or Buddhist lion) or fúshī (福獅, fortuitous lion), although they have many other names in China such as "Auspicious lion" or "guardian lions,"
but most simply they are traditionally known in China as Shi (獅, shī) or "lion."

Statues of these lions have stood guard over Chinese Imperial palaces, Imperial tombs, government offices, temples, as well as the homes of government officials and wealthy families, ever since the Han Dynasty (206 BC to 220 AD) and are honored as having powerful, mythic protective powers. It is not uncommon to see such lions used also as decorative or symbolic motifs in art, not to mention at the entrances to hotels, restaurants, supermarkets, and other buildings — even parks — one sitting at each side of an entrance. Ah, but they are not just common in China, but also in Japan, Okinawa and as far away as my other home of San Francisco. Indeed, wherever Chinese people have migrated, or Chinese culture has exerted its influence, one is likely to encounter fóshī.
- source : Hayato Tokugawa -

FOO DOGS Part II
Everything you wanted to know about Komainu, foshi, or "foo dogs".
Guardian lions in China are most often set in pairs, consisting of a male lion and a female lion, a representation of yin and yang (the male is yang, the female is yin.) The male rests his paw on an embroidered ball (绣球, xiù qiú), representing supremacy over the world; and the female often has her paw, the one closest to the male, resting (more than likely actually restraining) a cub: a representation of the cycle of life. Tradition says that the female protects those inside the building or place they guard while the male guards the structure or place itself. While the form of the lions was originally quite varied, it has over the centuries become formalized, particularly during the Ming and then the Qing dynasties, into the form we are most familiar with now.

Frequently one is likely to also see pairs of fóshī with the female's mouth closed and the male's open — said to be symbolic of the utterance of the sacred word "om." Other styles of fóshī may have both male and female with opened mouths, each containing a single, large pearl. In the case of many such pairs, the pearl is frequently completely carved so that it is free to roll about in the lion's mouth, but large enough that it cannot be removed.



Unlike the "guardian lions" one might see in front of a government or public building for example in the UK or in the United States, which are created to give a somewhat lifelike appearance of the animal, Chinese fóshī are carved with the intent of portraying the emotion of the lion as well as its symbolism. In the Chinese lions, the claws, teeth, and eyes represent power while it is rare that musculature is depicted at all; whereas in the English lion, it is its quite stylized with distinct musculature to portray its power.

Correct placement of the fóshī is essential as dictated by the principles of feng shui, ensuring that their beneficial effects are maximized. When, for example, standing in the doorway of a building looking out toward a street, or square, the same direction that the lions gaze at, the male is to be placed on the left and the female on the right; thus, when walking into a building or other place guarded by the lions, the male will be on the right and the female on the left.

One often hears, "But lions only exist in Africa!" Truth be told, Asiatic lions were once quite common in Southwest and Central Asia as well; and with the increase in trade, particularly during the Han dynasty, along the Silk Road, the depiction of lions, as well as their pelts, and even caged animals were introduced into China. Various ambassadors to China from the then "West" are known to have given gifts of live lions as tribute.
- source : Hayato Tokugawa -


FOO DOGS Part III - Japan
In Japan, one is likely to find a myriad of fóshī, only there they are commonly referred to as komainu (狛犬・胡麻犬) and are likely to be found at Shintō shrines, either guarding the entrance or even inside the shrine itself.


(Photographs by Tajimi Jones, also known as Aoi Tokugawa.)

In Japan, one is likely to find a myriad of fóshī, only there they are commonly referred to as komainu (狛犬・胡麻犬) and are likely to be found at Shintō shrines, either guarding the entrance or even inside the shrine itself. And despite the forced attempt to separate Buddhism from Shintō during Meiji, even the denigration of Buddhism at the time, komainu can also be found at Buddhist temples. Try as it might, the government just never quite managed to separate the two. There are two common forms, the jinnai komainu (陣内狛犬) or shrine inside komainu, which is the older of the two forms, and the sandō komainu (参道狛犬) or the "visiting road komainu) which took shape during the Edo period.

The pair of lions are typically identical to each other except that one has an open mouth while the other's is closed. Tradition holds that the open mouth is pronouncing the first letter of the Sanskrit alphabet, "a," while the closed mouth is speaking the last letter, "um," — a representation of the beginning and end of all things. Combined, they form the sound "Aum," sacred in both Hinduism and Buddhism. That's not to say that there are not exceptions to this "rule."
Komainu were "exported" from China to Korea, Japan, and Okinawa; and in Japan proper, they seem to have made their first appearance during the Nara period (710 – 794). They were used exclusively indoors until the 14th century and were then generally made of wood. During the following Heian period (794 – 1185), Komainu were frequently made of metal or stone in addition to wood, and were used as paper weights and doorstops among other things. In the Imperial Palace komainu were frequently used to support fusuma (襖).

It was also during the Heian (the 9th century) that the statues took on their "mouth open - mouth shut" forms we are most familiar with. The lion with the open mouth was called shishi (獅子, lion), while the other, with its mouth closed was called komainu or "koguryo dog" because it looked like…a dog — a chow chow, or a Japanese chin, or a Pekinese! Eventually they were both simply referred to as komainu.

The 14th century saw stone or metal "lion-dogs" moved outdoors in order to utilize its power to ward off evil as the guardians of gates and doors. This applied not just to public or private buildings, but to shrines and temples as well. During the Edo period, komainu were replaced or "assisted" by other creatures such as tigers, dragons and even foxes (Inari shrines) but I have yet to encounter a tanuki as a komainu.

Shinto is very important in the Tajimi area (the regions of Gifu-ken and Aichi-ken) like most of rural Japan. You will find more shrines than you could possibly imagine and just as many (times 2) komainu. These are all made by local craftsmen (first stone cutters, the rest by sculptors and ceramic artists). It could easily take years to visit all the shrines - a pilgrimage in itself.
- source : Hayato Tokugawa -

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A Korean komainu or haechi (age unknown).


We know that lions appeared in Indian temple art and, as early as the third century, showed up in the art of Chinese Buddhism; a symbol of protection of the dharma (the teachings of Buddha). Apparently as time progressed, it was determined that what was good for the Buddha must then also be good for the Emperor; thus, the lions became protectors of the gates and doors of imperial buildings and compounds. Now, the Chinese word for lion is shi 獅 or shishi 獅子; however, another creature that appeared in China at about the same time called the xiezhi, and at some point in time, between the third and seventh centuries, pairs of stone xiezhi made their way to Korea, where the name was pronounced haetae or haechi. The haechi appears very lion-like, but often has a scaly body, a small horn on its head, and sometimes small wings.

By the Nara period (710-794), lion guardians had journeyed to Japan, typically made of wood and intended for indoor use. By the ninth century, the pair came to consist of an open-mouthed lion (shishi 獅子) and one close-mouthed, horn-bearing, dog-like komainu (Korean dog. By the fourteenth century the horn disappeared, (although it does show up from time to time) and both animals of the pair came to be known as komainu, largely carved from stone and used out of doors.
- source : Hayato Tokugawa -


- quote -
Pìxiū 貔貅, which is pronounced Hikyū in Japan.
Also known in Chinese as Bìxié 避邪 or Tiān Lù 天禄. Also known in Japanese as Hekija 辟邪 or Tenroku 天禄.
A composite beast of ancient origin, mostly forgotten in Japan, but still popular today in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore. The mythological dragon-headed, lion-bodied Pìxiū 貔貅 (also spelled 豼貅) were traditionally depicted in China as a male-female pair, one with a single horn (male, Pì 貔) and the other with two horns (female, Xiū 貅), but in modern times they each commonly appear with only one horn. In ancient China, statues of the two guarded the entrance to the tomb, as they are thought to ward off evil and protect wealth.
In old China, the beasts were also commonly portrayed with hoofs, wings, and tails, and supposedly appeared on the banners of the emperor's chariots (兵車に立てた旗). In Japan, the Hikyū are largely ignored, having been supplanted by the Koma-inu (magical lion dogs) and Shishi (magical lions), who traditionally stand guard outside the gates of Japanese Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples. In Japan, effigies of Shishi lions are also commonly used as architectural elements, placed under the eaves of both Shintō shrines and Buddhist temples to ward off evil spirits.
Let us recall that, in China, the Pìxiū also serve this role, and in olden times were commonly displayed on the roof corners of the homes of the emperor and gentry.
- continue reading
- source : Mark Schumacher -


And please check the main page of Mark Schumacher about Komainu


CLICK for more photos !

SHISHI LIONS - SHRINE & TEMPLE GUARDIANS
WITH MAGICAL POWERS TO REPEL EVIL
Jp. = Shishi 獅子 or Kara Shishi 唐獅子, Chn. = Shíshī
Also known as Koma-inu 狛犬 (lion dog) in Japan
- source : Mark Schumacher -

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Largest Komainu in Gifu, 瑞浪市 Mizunami - made of Minoyaki pottery
高さ3.3m、幅1.56m、奥行き2.4m、総重量は15トン!
- Click here for photos ! -

Standing Komainu 逆立ち狛犬 / 立ち狛犬
- Click here for photos ! -

- Tatoo with Komainu 刺青 - (fb)

- Toys with Komainu - photos -

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Two statues by master sculptor 運慶 Unkei (? - 1223)






- look at more Komainu photos at the shrine 地主神社 Jinushi Jinja :
- reference source : jishujinja.or.jp/kigan -

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- Reference : 狛犬
- Reference : komainu



狛犬切手 Komainu Stamp - from 香取神宮 Katori Jingu
編集長の狛犬日記 - very informative !
- reference source : www15.plala.or.jp/timebox/top/08nikki -


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -



in the limelight
for two seconds -
photographer's luck!


. Shrine Ichi no Miya, Wadakita, Ohaga .
Gabi Greve at 和田北 一宮神社, my local shrine

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狛犬の片足折れぬ神の留守
komainu no ashi orenu kami no rusu

正岡子規 Masaoka Shiki

山法師狛犬古りし結願寺 我部敬子
市神の狛犬に角木下闇 田中英子
春の狛犬にさはりたがりしかな 夏井いつき
柿の浮力狛犬いちにち足そろふ 磯貝碧蹄館

狛犬にそびらの虚空のぞかるる 林田紀音夫
狛犬にテント結はへしラムネ売り 森重夫(万象)
狛犬に乳房が六つ山眠る 仙 とよえ
狛犬に木三本づつの雪囲ひ 川崎展宏
狛犬に犬を預けて盆踊 平上昌子

狛犬の仔は石気取り松の花 加藤あきと
狛犬の光る眼と合ひ初不動 室田東洋女
狛犬の口に溜まりし寒の雨 岡田久慧
狛犬の口の中なる蝉の殻 國守セツ
狛犬の口の奥まで残暑かな 渡辺初雄
狛犬の口より出でし石竜かな 巌谷小波
狛犬の台座もろとも苔の花 小野寺順子
狛犬の吽の口あく木下闇 友塚紀美恵
狛犬の渦のたてがみ青あらし 清水 白郎
狛犬の爪に立てかけ青写真 武田無涯子
狛犬の玉を踏みたる薄暑光 長谷川久々子
狛犬の相寄らぬまゝ冬の暮 川崎展宏
狛犬の走つてゆけり青嵐 小島健 木の実
狛犬の金歯赫々木下闇 河野静雲 閻魔
狛犬の金目うつろや神無月 仲澤輝子
狛犬の阿の口子蜘蛛出るわ出るわ 松山足羽
狛犬の阿吽を抜ける西東忌 森田智子
狛犬の頭に苔知恵の文殊堂 八木三日女
狛犬の首に真青な注連飾 藤本安騎生

狛犬は網かぶせられゐて灼くる 頼経嘉子
狛犬もよそよそしかりみな猛暑 丸山佳子
狛犬も邪鬼と睦むや雪囲して 文挟夫佐恵
狛犬や碓氷の神のしぐれける 川崎展宏
狛犬を葭簀の中に年の市 青邨

狼の眼の狛犬や山始 鳥居雨路子
秋風や狛犬白き美保神社 板谷芳浄
金襴を纒ふ狛犬初戎 野村浩之

- reference source : cgi-bin/HAIKUreikuDB -

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

In 1854, during a fire at the palace, the 獅子狛犬 Lions Dogs from the 清涼殿 Seiryoden Palace were brought to the home of the honorable 一条家 Ichijo Family for safekeeping by a high-ranking official working at the Seiryoden. Later they tried to find this man, but were told such an official does not exist. They said it must have been the spirit of the Komainu.


source : 15.plala.or.jp/timebox/top/05komamori/75/seiryoden

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. Gifu 岐阜県

At 白川村 Shirakawa village there was a wolf who had eaten the bones of a human and they gut stuck in his throat. The villagers helped him when they found him sitting and suffering in the compound of 八幡様 Hachiman Shrine. And the Deity promised to help the villagers from now on. So they changed the Komainu at the shrine and installed statues of wolves.


- and found by chance, two Komainu from Gifu, Hida


和良村の歴史資料官に
source : hidasaihakken.hida-ch.com

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. Iwate 岩手県

The authorities of 胆沢 Isawa ordered the Komainu in the park to be burried in the ground.
But after that, a lot of strange bad things happened in the village, as a curse of the Komainu.

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. Okayama 岡山県

. Kibitsu Komainu 吉備津狛犬 from the shrine Kibitsu Hiko Jinja 吉備津彦神社 .

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. Yamanashi 山梨県

Once the八幡さんの獅子 Lion Dogs from Hachiman Shrine were stolen.
But the home of the thief was soon befallen with diseases, fire and other disasters. So they all pledged to bring the Komainu back to the shrine and tried to pull them along with a horse. But the horse could not move, they were too heavy.
Then a man took one on his back - and what do you say - it was so light, he could carry it with no problem.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database -

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- #komainu #guardiandog #foodog -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Japan - Shrines and Temples on 1/02/2017 09:46:00 am

16 Dec 2016

KAPPA - Chikugobo Tengu


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
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Chikugoboo Koorazan 高良山筑後坊
Chikugobo, Korazan Chikugo-Bo

高良山筑後坊(コウラザンチクゴボウ)A Tengu from Mount Korasan in the Chikugo region, now Kurume, Fukuoka.

He is one of the
. 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan .

There is almost nothing to be found about this Tengu, only his name.
Here is some information about the region and Mount Korasan.

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. Koora Taisha 高良大社 Shrine Kora Daisha .
Also called 高良玉垂命神社 or 高良玉垂宮 Kora Tamataregu.
福岡県久留米市御井町1番地 / Kōra taisha 1 Miimachi, Kurume, Fukuoka
Kora Taisha is a prestigious, and the largest shrine in the region as the first shrine in Chikugo 筑後.
At a height of 312 meters, Mount Kora stands on the westernmost edge of the Mino Mountain Range. ... Kora Taisha Shrine, a former National Shrine and a major shrine in the Chikugo region.



筑後高良山高隆寺(御井寺)/ 高良山玉垂宮 Kora Shrine
source : biglobe.ne.jp/~s_minaga/ato_korasan

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- quote
Chikugo Province (筑後国 Chikugo no kuni) is the name of a former province of Japan in the area that is today the southern part of Fukuoka Prefecture on Kyūshū. It was sometimes called Chikushū (筑州), with Chikuzen Province. Chikugo was bordered by Hizen, Chikuzen, Bungo, and Higo Provinces.
The ancient capital of the province was located near the modern city of Kurume, Fukuoka.
In the Edo Period the province was divided into two fiefs: the Tachibana clan held a southern fief at Yanagawa, and the Arima clan held a northern fief at Kurume.
... Kōra taisha was the chief Shinto shrine (ichinomiya) of Chikugo.
- source : wikipedia

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There are many legends about Kappa 河童 the Water Goblin in Fukuoka and the Chikugo region.

Chikugo is the origin of a kind of Kappa Gaku Music, which is now an important intangible folk culture asset in Oita 大分県無形民俗文化財.
. Kappa Gaku 河童楽 "Music for the Kappa" .
and
more Kappa Legends from Kyushu  河童伝説 - 九州
and
Oita 大分県 : 三隈川(筑後川)River Mikumagawa (Chikugogawa)


Kyushu's largest river, the Chikugogawa 筑後川 Chikugo River, runs through Kurume and makes up part of a fertile area that has long been called the Chikugo Plains.
. Kappa Legends from Tanushimaru 田主丸 Fukuoka .


. suijin 水神 water deity and Kappa legends .
In the year 901, when Sugawara Michizane was about to be murdered at the 筑後川 Chikugogawa river, the general of the regional Kappa 河童の大将 stretched out his arm to help him, but his hand was cut off.
at Kitano Tenmangu - Fukuoka 福岡県の北野天満宮



筑後の国には水天宮 / 筑後河畔の河童伝説 / 筑前と筑後
- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
筑後 河童 11 legends to explore about the Kappa from Chikugo

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

南筑後山村行 / 『筑後風土記』 / 筑後久留米 Chikugo Kurume
八女郡黒木町大字黒木下町(旧筑後国上妻郡黒木町) . . .
- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
27 legends to explore about the region (00)

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. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #chikugobo #korazanfukuoka #korasan #lchikugogawa -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Kappa - The Kappapedia on 12/12/2016 01:17:00 pm

29 Nov 2016

FUDO - Namura Shrine Shiga

https://japanshrinestemples.blogspot.jp/2016/11/namura-jinja-shiga.html

Namura Jinja Shiga

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
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Namura Jinja 苗村神社 Namura Shrine, Shiga


滋賀県蒲生郡竜王町大字綾戸467 / 467 Ayado, Ryuo-cho, Gamo-gun, Shiga

- quote
Namura Shrine in Ayado in Ryuo Town, Shiga Prefecture, is a historic shrine and a treasure trove of cultural properties since most of the structures of the shrine are nationally designated as either a National Treasure (NT) or an Important Cultural Property (ICP). The origin of the shrine is not clear, but, as many Kofun (ancient Imperial tombs) have been discovered in the area, it is considered that this shrine was originally founded to enshrine the spirits of ancestors.

The Romon gate (ICP) has the impressively huge thatched roof.
The wooden statue of Fudo Myoo (ICP) is enshrined in the Fudo Hall in the precinct, which is the reminder of Shinbutsu Shugo (the fusion of Shinto and Buddhism) practiced until the end of the Edo period (1868).

The main hall, Nishi-Honden (NT), was constructed in 969 to enshrine the deity Kunisazuchi no Mikoto, who had resided in Mt. Kongo in Yoshino in Yamato province (present-day Nara Prefecture). The old shrine located on the opposite side of the road is the east shrine, Higashi Honden (ICP), which enshrines Okuninushi no Mikoto and Susanoo no Mikoto.

Namura Shrine is the head shrine of all the branch shrines in 33 adjacent villages; hereby the Grand Autumn Festival is held once every 33 years.
- source : Nippon Kichi

- - - - - Deities in residence - - - - -
那牟羅彦神 Husband : Namurahiko no Kami
那牟羅姫神 Wife : Namurahime no Kami
- A couple to protect the family.

国狭槌命 Kunisazuchi no Mikoto(西本殿)
大国主命 Okuninushi no Mikoto (東本殿)
素盞嗚尊 Susanoo no Mikoto(東本殿)


- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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shuin 朱印 stamp



- - - - - HP of the Shrine
- source : rmc.ne.jp/dragon-kanko -


- quote -
The large, holy forest in the center of the town is the location of the Namura-jinja Shrine, a National Treasure.
Much of the shrine is designated as National Treasures or Important Cultural Properties. During the New Year's Eve celebrations free amazake, a sweet drink made with fermented rice, is given to all worshippers through to the morning of the New Year, and the shrine always experiences a throng of visitors.
- source : en.biwako-visitors.jp/spot/detail -

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A statue of Fudo Myo-O from the Kamakura period. About 96 cm high.

着衣には緑青、白、朱など華やかな色彩が残る。不動明王の特徴である怒りの表情を表現し、顔を左に向け、左肩を前方に出して上半身を捻らせ、左腕を後ろに引いて腰のあたりで宝剣を握り、左足を開いて岩座に立つ動的な姿に特徴がある。平安時代後期から鎌倉時代初期の作と考えられる.
- reference source : biwako-visitors.jp/shinbutsuimasu -


. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja – Vidyaraja – Fudo Myoo .


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- Reference : 苗村神社
- Reference : namura shrine shiga


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

- #namuraayadoshiga #namurajinja -
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8 Nov 2016

TENGU - and cedar tree legends

https://heianperiodjapan.blogspot.jp/2016/10/tengu-cedar-legends.html

Tengu cedar legends

- BACK to the Daruma Museum -
. Japanese legends and tales 伝説 民話 昔話 - Introduction .
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Tengu, sugi 天狗と杉と伝説 Legends about Tengu and Cedar trees

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .
- Introduction -

. sugi 杉 Japanese Cedar, Cryptomeria japonica .
- Introduction -

This tree grows in many sacred grounds and some are really huge
oosugi 大杉 Osugi, Big Cecar Tree
ipponsugi, ippon sugi 一本杉 "solitaryt cedar tree



source and more photos : tensugi.blog119.fc2.com
「越後の天杉日記」Echigo no Tensugi Nikki : 天狗の大杉 / 天杉杉太

The Tengu like to reside in these trees and some are even called
Tengusugi, Tengu-sugi 天狗杉 Tengu Cedar Tree.

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- - - - - ABC List of the prefectures :


.......................................................................... Gifu 岐阜県 ............................

飛騨地方 Hida district

Once a child had a high fever, so the Tengu from Ipponsugi came down to comfort it.

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揖斐郡 Ibi district 春日村 Kasuga

To build a new bridge a 大檜 huge hinoki cypress tree and a cedar tree growing downstream of the river were cut down. THat night a Tengu appeared in the dream of the land owner and scolded him: "Now you have taken away my home, so I will destroy your village!"
And indeed, that night a fire broke out and most of the village burned down.
This was the great fire of Meiji 10, 明治10年1月18日.

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加茂郡 Kamo district

The Tengu is also called 狗賓 Guhin / Kuhin.
He lives in the deep forest and produced balls of fire at night to frighten the villagers. There are a few large cedar trees where he lives. When people have to walk here at night, they might hear a laughter if the Tengu is in a good mood.
If he is in a bad mood, he will throw pebbles and sand an the people. People who experience this will soon have more misfortune in their lives.

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吉城郡 Yoshiki district

Once a child was abducted by the Tengu and later found dead under the solitary cedar tree.


.......................................................................... Ishikawa 石川県 ............................
小松市 Komatsu



Come on down to Osugi between Oct 2-10 2016 to see our fun and fabulous
"Yokubari Tengu" よくばり天狗 (The Greedy Goblin).
We first did this show in 1997, and again in 2003, followed by three sequels! This is the original, telling how the tengu statue in Osugi turned to stone.



In our village of Osugi there is a statue of a Tengu, made by Kurakichi Okura in the 1970's. This statue is the inspiration for our tengu musicals and projects.
We first produced Yokubari Tengu (The Greedy Goblin) in 1997, a "new legend" about how he turned to stone. In 2004, we put on Yokubari Tengu II: I'm Back!
This year the saga continues with Yokubari Tengu III: Adventures on the Tengu Planet.


- source : osugi musicaltheatre.com -


.......................................................................... Kyoto 京都府 ............................

役行者 En no Gyoja and 雲遍上人 Unpen Shonin

- - - - - The story is similar to the one told at Nikko (Tochigi).
Around 700 the two came to a large waterfall. A thunderstorm came with heavy rainfall and the Tengu, who lived in a huge cedar tree, appeared.
The two were undisturbed in their prayers and then in beams of light Jizo Bosatsu, the Dragon God, 富婁那 Punna the Arhat, Bishamonten and Aizen Myo-O appered and the Tengu was gone.
The two built a sanctuary in the mountains and venerated the huge cedar tree as
Kiyotaki 清滝 the Dragon Deity of the Pure Waterfall.


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鞍馬山 Mount Kuramasan

. The Tengu Sōjōbō 僧正坊 of Mount Kurama .
He often came to the Tengu Sugi to rest his wings.



.......................................................................... Miyazaki宮崎県 ............................

Near the old burrial ground and 古墳 Kofun there are many old trees. One is the 天狗杉 Tengu Sugi. This Tengu with wings and a red face likes to fly from cedar to cedar and sometimes even stays in a 松 pine tree.

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清武町 Kiyotake

Near the Kofun of 岩見田 Iwamida there are some Tengu Sugi, where the Tengu lives:
Shoode no Tengu sugi 正手の天狗杉 Tengu cedar from Shode
Ookubo no Tengu sugi 大久保の天狗杉 Tengu cedar from Okubo
The one at Shode burned down after a thunderbolt hit it.
The one at Okubo was cut down to make room for housing.


.......................................................................... Nara 奈良県 ............................

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桜井市 Sakurai

. Hasedera 長谷寺 Temple Hase-dera .

When the Head Priest Eigaku 英岳大僧正 was still a young acolyte at the temple, he did not study much. Eigaku had to light all the lanterns, but the Tengu from the Cedar Tree (in the form of a squirrel) run around and extinguished them and caused other trouble at night. So Eigaku collected all his wits and eventually threatened the Tengu:
"When I become High Priest here, I will cut down all the cedar trees and you will have no more place to live here!"
Eigaku was not really a dilligent student, but from this time on he changed his ways and eventually at the age of 60 became the High Priest 大僧正 Daisojo of the temple.


source : sacredjapan.com/Temple

He had all the huge cedar trees cut down and used the wood to repair the temple buildings.
Only one of the trees he did not cut down, the 天狗杉 Tengu Sugi, to remind him and the people in the future of the Tengu, who eventually helped him to become a dilligent student and high priest.



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山辺郡 Yamabe district

Jinyaji 神野寺 Temple Jinya-Ji
At this temple there was a huge Tengu Sugi tree of some ten meters high and 3 meters in circumference. The bark of the trunk and the branches had come off. This is because a Tengu lived there and instructed his disciples, practising the jump from branch to branch and up the trunk.

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Tengusugi 天狗杉
Once upon a time it the forest of Nara there was a very old temple and a large forest of cedar trees surrounded it. A lot of たちの悪い天狗 bad Tengu lived there.

This is basically the story of Hasedera, but the priest here is called
Fugaku 芙岳(ふがく)



- read Manga Nihon Mukashibanashi :
- reference source : nihon.syoukoukai.com/modules -


.......................................................................... Okayama 岡山県 ............................
久米郡 Kume district

From 二上山 Mount Futakami, the highest peak in this area, there is a great view to Mount Daisen. Sometimes the Tengu from Mount Daisen takes a flight and comes here to rest his huge wings.

. Ryosan-Ji 両山寺のニ上杉、大杉 "Futakami Sugi" 天狗杉 Tengu-Sugi .



.......................................................................... Tochigi 栃木県 ............................
日光市 Nikko

En no Gyoja 役小角 and 雲遍上人 Unpen Shonin once came to a 清瀧 waterfall in the 日光山 Nikko Mountains to practise austerities. Suddenly a black cloud hang over the waterfall and a terrible thunderstorm rattled and strong wind blew.
The two of them were 一心不乱 undisturbed by all this, sat down and said their esoteric mantras in deep quiet.
Suddenly the sky cleared again and now they saw a Tengu sitting in the branches of the large cedar tree. The Tengu faded from sight in no time.

. Nikkoozan Tookooboo 日光山東光坊 Tengu Tokobo. Toko-Bo from Mount Nikko .
There used to live many Tengu in the mountains of Nikko, and their boss was Tokobo.
He is seen as in incarnation of Tokugawa Ieyasu.


.......................................................................... Tokyo 東京都 ............................
板橋区 Itabashi

In the middle of the fields there was a huge cedar tree. Its branches hang down to the ground. This is because a Tengu often came here and sits on it. So it is called 天狗杉.
Now it is at the bottom the slope 松山の坂 Matsuyama no Saka, which is also called
天狗坂 Tengusaka, Tengu-Saka.

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- quote -
Up for Spiritual Waterfall Training?
..... try doing a pilgrim at Mount Mitake.



Along the way, you will see mother nature's beauty at its best. An example of this is the 350-year-old cedar tree called Tengu-no-Koshikake.
- source : jpninfo.com/39507 -



.......................................................................... Toyama 富山県 ............................

. Tengosama テンゴサマ / Tengohan テンゴハン .
Tengu in the Toyama dialect.


.......................................................................... Wakayama 和歌山県 ............................

Tengu no koshikake sugi 天狗の腰掛杉 Cedar where the Tengu sits down
A few meters up from this cedar tree there was a huge boulder in the middle of the road. Around 1640 a stone mason tried to split this boulder and begun to make a hole in it.
Suddenly he heard a loud voice coming from the cedar tree
"Hey you there, what you think you are doing?"
He became frightened for his life and run away as fast as he could.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
天狗杉 (ok) / 大杉 (ok) 一本杉 (ok)
75 tengu and 杉 to explore (00)



天狗杉のたたり the curse of the Tengu
manga nihon mukashibanashi
- source : nihon syoukoukai com -

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. En no Gyôja 役行者 Founder of Shugendo .
En no Ozuno 役小角 "En with the small horn"

. Unpen Shoonin 雲遍上人 Saint Unpen Shonin .
Taichoo, Taichō 泰澄上人 Saint Taicho Shonin / Taicho-Daishi 泰澄大師 (682 ?683 - 767)
Etsu no 越の大徳 Etsu no Daitoku - Great Man of Virtue from Etsu
Shiramine Daisoojo 天狗 白峰大僧正 Tengu Shiramine Daisojo


. Legends about Kobo Daishi Kukai - 弘法大師 空海 - 伝説 .

. Japanese legends and tales 伝説 民話 昔話 - Introduction .

- Yookai 妖怪 Yokai Monsters of Japan -
- Introduction -

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. Join the friends on Facebook ! .

- #tengucedartree #tengusugi #sugitengu -
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5 Oct 2016

SHRINES Aburahi Jinja in Shiga

https://japanshrinestemples.blogspot.jp/2016/10/aburahi-jinja-shiga.html

Aburahi Jinja Shiga

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
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Aburahi Jinja 油日神社 Aburahi Shrine, Shiga



滋賀県甲賀市甲賀町油日1042 / 1042 Kokacho Aburahi, Koka, Shiga

- quote
Located in Koka, Shiga Prefecture, not much is known about the establishment of Aburahi-jinja but it is known that Shotoku Taishi founded it. Long ago it is said that the god 油日大明神 Aburahi-dai-myojin ascended the nearby mountain of Aburahidake; upon his ascent he emitted a dazzling light like that of oil that was lit on fire, and thus the name 油火"Aburahi" was given to the mountain.
Due to this legend, this shrine receives much reverence from people who work in the oil industry. The shrine has an unusual "straight line" layout with a solemn "romon" gate, prayer hall, and main hall. All of these were constructed during the Muromachi Period (1336 - 1573) and all of them are designated as Important Cultural Property of Japan.
There are also trees on the premises that are over 700 years old and an umbrella pine tree that is designated as a Natural Monument of Shiga Prefecture.

Every year on the first of May a "Taiko Dance" is held as a prayer for rain; this is designated as an Intangible Folk Cultural Asset of Japan.
Another event that is held is the "Yakko-buri"(Yakkofuri); this event is held every 5 years and involves a procession of over 60 people singing unique songs and wearing eye-catching costumes. This event is designated as an Intangible Folk Cultural Asset of Shiga Prefecture.
- source : japanhoppers.com/kansai

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- - - - - Deitiy in residence - - - - -
Aburahigami, Aburahi no Kami 油日あぶらひ神
油日大神 Aburahi no Okami

In the Eastern Hall 東相殿に罔象女神 - Mizuba no Me no Kami
In the Western Hall 西相殿に猿田彦神 - Sarutahiko no Kami

This deity brings good luck and winning in war and was thus revered by the Samurai.
And also by merchants dealing in abura - Oil.


福大夫面 面、長さ20cm、巾14.8cm、mask



- quote -
福大夫面附ずずい子 mask and zuzuiko figure
ずずい子全身像、丈52cm

徳川の末まで毎年正月初申の夜、拝殿にて上・下の瀬古神主家が勤めていた稲講会、種蒔神事に用いた祭具で、面は、長さ20cm、巾14.8cm、背面には 「奉寄進正一位油日大明神田作福太夫神之面、永正5年(1508)戊辰6月18日櫻宮聖出雲作(花押)」の銘があり、ずずい子は全身像で丈52cm、背面 には「出雲明秀(花押)」の銘があり、花押、出雲などから見て同一人の作と思われる。
ずずい子は鈴の転訛で男のほめ言葉らしい。
彫りは共に素朴で美しく力強い線を出して名工の作とされている。稲講会の歌は21あり、宝暦、安永の古器古書に書き残されている。永禄八年(1565)、 足利義昭将軍当時、覚慶公方が当社にお参りしてこの面をかぶり、ずずい子を抱いて「われは油日のくぐつなり」と自嘲したことはあまり世に知られていない。
- reference source : fdi.ne.jp/koka/koka2.html -

zuzuiko is a word deformation of suzu 鈴 (bell), referring to a strong man with a large penis. It is a symbol of fertility and agricultural blessings for a good harvest.
This figure dates back to about 1508 or 1509. It is about 52 cm high.

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- - - - - The Shrine was founded by
聖徳太子 Prince Shotoku Taishi (574 - 622)
or
用明天皇朝 Yomei Tenno (? - 587) - or - 天武天皇 Tenbu Tenno (? - 686)


. tenpi, tenbi, tenka 天火 "fire from heaven" .
天火(落雷 rakurai) lightning
hi no tama 火の玉 ball of fire

and aburabi 油火 "oil fire"


Aburahidake 油日岳(694m)



The whole mountain Aburahidake is seen as the female deity
. Mizuha no me no kami 罔象女神 Mizuba no Me no Kami .


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shuin 朱印 stamp



omamori お守り amulets - Daruma in five colors


- - - - - HP of the Shrine
- source : aburahijinjya.jp-

The shrine has often been a part of TV dramas:
油日神社の映画ロケ情報
- reference source : aburahijinjya.jp/roke -

- quote -
朝野の崇敬と甲賀の総社 The most important of the Shrines of Koka
元慶以降御代々々神階は累進して弘和の頃正一位に昇り給い、明応の棟札を始め古書古器皆正一位油日大神と見えている。この神階奉授のこと、或は朝臣参向の こと共朝廷の御崇敬の厚かったのを窮い得る。中世に入ると、或は明応の本殿再建、永禄の楼門建立となり、或は天正年間永代神領百石の寄進、元和奉献の鐘楼 など甲賀武士及地頭領主等の数々の尊信の跡を残している。然もこゝに特筆すべきは、郡下官民が当社を以て「江洲に無隠大社」と仰ぎ「甲賀の総社」としてそ の御神徳を敬いまつったことである。
即ち明応年間本殿造営の御奉加は実に近郷一円に亘り、油日谷、大原谷、佐治谷、岩室郷に於いて 頭殿 をはじめ多くの所役をつとめて当社大祭を奉仕し来たことは千年来の事実である。岩室の鎮守瀧樹神社、小佐治の明神佐治神社、石部の古社吉御子吉姫神社等の 間に現に存している幾多の縁由、杣、横田、野洲、遠くは大戸の地域に及ぶ郡下全円その史実古伝に於いて或は神輿を頒ち、之を祭り、祭日を特定し、或は分霊 と伝え、親子の縁を称し、その崇敬の跡を豊富に存している。
野洲川(天安河)の上流祝詞ケ原の聖地からは、常に油日大神と天照大神が遙祭されていた。かくして現に崇敬者は郡下四万余戸に及んでいる。この深い広い崇 敬は即ち社頭の隆盛となり、維新前はその神領に於ても野山除地村内にて五百四十余町歩、近郷にて千百三十余町歩の山手米を有し、境内亦十一町三反七畝歩を 算した。
現に楼門内社前の壮厳な結構は六町歩の神奈備と相俟って他にその例なく、
よく「甲賀の総社」としての真面目を呈している。
- reference source : aburahijinjya.jp/yuisyo -

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Yearly Festivals 年中行事

Yakkofuri 奴振 Yakko-furi
and Taiko Odori 太鼓踊 Drum Dance

This festival is held every five years on May 1. The last time was in 2016

この油日神社の祭礼として行われる油日祭りは、平年は4月25日に行われる獅子の布付け神事に始まり、6日間にわたる獅子巡行を経て、5月1日に御輿渡御で終る。



油日祭りの奴振・甲賀市 - with more photos
- reference source : shigabunka.net/archives -



CLICK for more photos !

- reference : aburahi shrine yakko -

. yakko 奴 halberd-bearers and servants of a Daimyo .


2月18日 祈年祭 New Year Ritual

9月11日 岳ごもり - staying at the top of the mountain and burning a ritual fire all night.
油日岳頂上にて徹夜でご神火を焚き上げ参籠

9月13日 大宮ごもり - Autumn Festival
11月23日 新嘗祭 Niiname Ritual

諸願成就月次祭 - 毎月1日 Monthly rituals on the 1st.
油の月次祭 - 毎月13日 Monthly rituals on the 13th.

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. Shootoku Taishi, Shōtoku Taishi 聖徳太子 Prince Shotoku Taishi .

- Reference : 油日神社
- Reference : aburahi jinja


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

油日の神の御饌田の田亀かな
aburahi no kami no gosaiden no tagame kana

the giant water bug
from the Shrine fields of the God
Aburahi no Kami . . .


岡井省二 Okai Shoji (1925 - 2001)
Haiku poet from Mie.

. tagame 田亀 / 水爬虫(たがめ) "field turtle" .
Japanese giant water bug / beetle / Lethocerus deyrollei
- kigo for all summer -

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- #aburahi #aburahijinja #aburahishiga -
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19 Jun 2016

SHRINES - Hashihime Bridge Deity


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
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Hashihime, Hashi Hime 橋姫 / はし姫 "Princess of the Bridge"
"bridge maiden", "The Lady at the Bridge"


Uji no Hashi Hime 宇治の橋姫, 織津比売 (せおりつひめ)の神
. Checkpoints, barriers around Kyoto .

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- quote
Hashihime (橋姫) ("the maiden of the bridge")
is a character that first appeared in Japanese Heian-period literature, represented as a woman who spends lonely nights waiting for her lover to visit, and later as a fierce "oni" or demon fueled by jealousy. She came to be associated most often with a bridge in Uji.


Kyōka Hyaku-Monogatari 1853

Very little is known about the origin of Hashihime. The most common interpretation is that she was a lonely wife pining for her husband / lover to return but due to his infidelity, she became jealous and turned into a demon.
- source : wikipedia

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Hashihime no Yashiro 橋姫の社
Hashihime Jinja 橋姫神社 Hashihime Shrine




橋姫の社(はしひめのやしろ) は宇治橋の西づめにあり。はじめは二社なり。一社は洪水のとき漂流す。いま、礎存せり。
『古今』  さむしろに衣かたしくこよひもやわれをまつらんうぢの橋姫  読人しらず
この歌の評説をもって祭る神をしか云ふなり。『袖中抄』に、「住吉大明神橋姫の神にかよひ詠みたまふ歌なり」とぞ。清輔の説には、「山には山の神あり、橋には橋の神あり。姫とは佐保姫・竜田姫などに同じ。旧妻を橋姫になぞらふ」となり。一条禅閤(いちじょうぜんこう)の御説には、「離宮の神、夜ごとに通ひたまふとて、暁ごとにおびたたしく狼のたつ音のする」となん。
玄恵(げえん)法印の日く、「むかし嵯峨天皇の御とき、をとこにねたみある女、貴船のやしろに七夜丑の時参りして、この河瀬に髪をひたし悪鬼と化す。これを橋姫といふなり」。宗祇(そうぎ)の説には、「おもひかはしたる妻、立ちわかれて恋しきままに、『なれもわれをまつらん』とはし姫を妻によそへて、かこちいへる儀なるべし」。また『源氏物語』に「橋姫」の巻あり。これはなぞらへて書けるのみなり。この歌に付きてさまざまの儀侍れどもその詮なきよし、定家卿も宣ひけるとぞ。また逍遥院(しょうよういん)殿の御説も、清輔・宗祇のいふところに同じ。佐保姫・竜田姫・橋姫、これを三姫といふて、深き口授のあるよし、歌道の師によりて明らむべし。


あじろ木にいざよふ浪の音ふけてひとりやねぬるうちの橋姫 
ajirogi ni izayou nami no oto fukete hitori ya nenuru uji no hashihime 
慈円 - Jien (1155 - 1225) - 『新古』

橋姫のおるや錦とみゆるかな紅葉いざよふうぢの河波  
後宇多院 Gouda-In (Gouda Tenno) (1267 - 1324) - 『新千』 


宇治市宇治蓮華47 Uji
- source : sites.google.com/site/miyakomeisyo -


Writing Margins: The Textual Construction of Gender in Heian and Kamakura Japan
By Terry Kawashima
The figure of Hashihime, . . .
- with poems about the Hashihime
- source : books.google.co.jp -



はし姫のもみぢ重やかりてましたびねは寒し宇治の川かぜ
Hashihime no momijigasane ya kari te mashi tabine wa samushi Uji no kawakaze.

Wondering if I should borrow
from the Princess of Bridges
this robe of autumn leaves—
my rest while traveling so cold...
the Uji River wind.


Otagaki Rengetsu (1791 - 1875)

- source : rengetsu.org/poetry_db -


さむしろに衣かたしきこよひもや我をまつらむうぢのはしひめ
samushiro ni koromo katashiki koyo mo ya ware o matsuramu uji no hashihime

On a thin straw mat
Beneath a single layer of clothes
On this night, too,
I wonder, does she await me,
My maid at Uji Bridge.


source : Anonymous - wakapoetry.net



さむしろや待つ夜の秋の風ふけて. 月をかたしく宇治の橋姫
samushiro ya matsu yo no aki no kaze fukete tsuki wo katashiku uji no hashihime

How cold!
waiting out the autumn's weary night
deepening as the wind blows
she spreads out the moon's light
the Princess of Uji Bridge.


Fujiwara no Teika
- source : wikipedia -


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- quote -
橋姫(はしひめ)
は、橋にまつわる日本の伝承に現れる女性・鬼女・女神である。
- Image 鳥山石燕『今昔画図続百鬼』より「橋姫」。解説文に「橋姫の社は山城の国宇治橋にあり」とあることから、宇治の橋姫を描いたものと解釈されている。
- Image 鳥山石燕『今昔画図続百鬼』より「丑の刻参り」
- Image 現在の堀川と戻り橋
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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- quote -
Hashihime – The Bridge Princess
From Mizuki Shigeru, Yōkai Stories
Nothing quite embodies the saying "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned" like the Hashihime. A human woman consumed by jealousy and hatred, she transformed herself through sheer willpower—and the assistance of a helpful deity who taught her a complicated ritual—into a living demon of rage and death. A yokai from the Heian period, she is one of the most powerful and fierce creatures in Japan's menagerie.



What Does Hashihime Mean?
With only two kanji, her name is straight-forward: 橋 (hashi; bridge) 姫 (hime; princess). But there is a secret meaning hidden inside. In ancient Japanese, the word airashi (愛らしい; pretty; charming; lovely; adorable) could be pronounced "hashi." So "Hashihime the Bridge Princess" was also a homophone for (愛姫) "Hashihime the Pretty Princess."
The only real question is why does such a horrible demon have such a lovely, delicate name? This is because the name predates the monster. There have been Bridge Princesses—benign deities of the water—for far longer than there have been jealous women with crowns of iron and burning torches clenched between their teeth.
- - - Hashihime as Water Goddess
Going back into ancient, pre-literate Japan, there has long been a mythology built around bridges. Japan was—and still is—an animistic culture where nature is embodied by spirits of good and ill. The wonders of nature, like particularly large and twisted trees or odd and out of place rocks, had their own guardian deities called kami. Rivers too, especially large rivers, were the abodes of gods. ...
In the year 905 CE, we get one of the oldest known written mentions of the Hashihime, in a poem from the 14th scroll of the Kokin Wakashū (古今和歌集; Collection of Poems of Ancient and Modern Times). This is especially notable because it mentions not just any Hashihime, but the Hashihime of Uji—a legend that would come to dominate all images of this fantastic creature.

Upon a narrow grass mat
laying down her robe only
tonight, again –
she must be waiting for me,
Hashihime of Uji


- - - Hashihime as Female Demon
How the transformation happened—from benign, sexy river goddess to avatar of female rage—is unknown. Most likely it happened like all folklore, organically and over time. The shrines to the Hashihime existed near bridges, and as people forgot their original purpose they began to make up new stories. Most of these stories tended to include some legend of the Hashihime as "woman done wrong." There are old legends of a woman whose husband went off to war and never came back, and she wept by the river bank in sorrow until she was transformed into the Hashihime. Others are stories of jealousy and revenge. ...
While Lady Rokujo is not the Hashihime, ...
- - - The Heike Monogatari and the Hashihime of Uji
...The Heike Monogatari emphasizes repeatedly than the Hashihime is a "still-living" oni. ...
Toriyama's Text:
"The Goddess Hashihime lives in the under the Uji Bridge in Yamashiro province (Modern day Southern Kyoto). That is the explanation for this drawing of the Hashihime of Uji."
- - - Kanawa 鉄輪 – The Iron Crown
The Noh play Kanawa (鉄輪; The Iron Crown) comes from one of the versions of the Hashihime story from the Heike Monogatari. ...
- - - Other Hashihime
Although she is by far the most famous, the Hashihime of Uji is not the only Hashihime. Nagarabashi bridge over the Yodogawa river in Osaka and the Setanokarabashi bridge over the Setagawa river in Sega prefecture also lay claim to their own Hashihimes.
- - - The Hashihime Shrine
..... Shrine records claim the Hashihime Shrine dates back to 646 CE, making it older than most known legends of the Hashihime of Uji. Most likely it was originally dedicated to the water goddess under the bridge, and the kami of the shrine evolved along with the legends. ...
- source : Zack Davisson -

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- quote -
The Tale of the Hashihime of Uji
Translated from the Heike Monogatari
During the Imperial reign of the Emperor Saga, there lived a courtly lady consumed by jealousy. So powerfully was she in jealousy's grip that she made a pilgrimage to the shrine at Kifune and cloistered in prayer. For seven days, she devoted herself to a single-minded wish: "Oh great and powerful Kami of Kifune, grant me the powers of a devil while I am still living. Make me a fierce being, terrible to behold. Let my outer form match the flame of jealousy that burns so brightly within. Let me kill."



That great miracle-working Kami of Kifune understood the depths of her desire, and heeded her call. "I am moved by pity and by the sincerity of your prayer. If you wish to become a living oni, to change into a monstrous form, get thee to the Kawase river in Uji. Perform the ceremony I shall now teach you, and then return to submerge yourself in the waters of the river. Do this for 21 days." This courtly lady saw and heard the manifestation of this celestial being, and was in rapture.
- continued here
- source : Zack Davisson -


. ikiryoo 生霊 . 生き霊 Ikiryo"living spirit" .
vengeful spirit, mostly female
ushi no toki mairi

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totose 十歳 - an expression from the Genji Monogatari.
Hashi Hime, Hashihime 橋姫

その人もかしこにてうせ侍にし後ととせあまりにて
sono hito mo kashiko ni te use haberi ni shi nochi,
totose amari nite

quote
A pictorial subject based on "The Lady at the Bridge" Hashihime, Chapter 45 of GENJI MONOGATARI 源氏物語 (The Tale of Genji).



The last ten chapters of the Tale are known as UJI JUUJOU 宇治十帖 (The Ten Books of Uji). This chapter, the first of the ten, introduces the Eighth Prince Hachi no miya 八宮, a half-brother of Genji, and his two daughters, Ooigimi 大君 and Naka no kimi 中君, who live with him in his self-imposed retirement at Uji (south of Kyoto). The prince is known for his piety and wisdom. Kaoru 薫, whose serious character is engendered by deep misgivings about his paternity, begins to study under Hachi no miya.
Eventually he learns from Ben no kimi 弁君, the daughter of *Kashiwagi's 柏木 wet nurse, that he is not in fact Genji's son, but rather the illegitimate son of Kashiwagi. The scene most frequently chosen for illustration shows Ooigimi playing a lute biwa 琵琶 and Naka no kimi a harp koto 琴 under the moon and clouds while Kaoru secretly peers in through a break in the villa's bamboo fence.
This scene survives in a section of the earliest illustrated version (12c) in the Tokugawa 徳川 Art Museum.
source : Jaanus


. Matsuo Basho - totose 十歳 .
aki totose kaette Edo o sasu kokyoo

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Tea Bowl, Known as "Hashihime" (bridge maiden)
Mino ware, Shino type, Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period, 16th - 17th century



- source : Tokyo National Museum -

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- Reference : 橋姫
- Reference : Hashihime


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

- #hashihime #hashihimeshrine -
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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

Shrine Hashihime no Yashiro, Uji
京都府宇治市宇治蓮華47番地

If the procession of a wedding passes before this shrine, someone will certainly become very ill or even die. It is also possible that the wedding will not be successful and the couple divorced.

During the Time of Minamoto no Raikō many people suddenly disappeared.
When he investigated the events, he found that during the times of 嵯峨天皇 Saga Tenno a very jealous woman cast a spell at 貴船の社 Kifune Shrine.
The shrine is therefore associated with the Ushi no toki mairi 丑の時参り, the ritual of wearing candles on one's head and laying a curse at a shrine during the "hour of the Ox", since it is from the resident deity that Hashihime learns the prescribed ritual to turn herself into an oni鬼 demon to exact vengeance.
This story is told in the Noh play Kanawa 金輪 ("The Iron Crown").

. 源頼光 Minamoto no Yorimitsu, Raiko (948 - 1021) .
Minamoto no Raikō


- reference : nichibun yokai database -

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Posted By Gabi Greve to Japan - Shrines and Temples on 6/18/2016 10:35:00 am