1 Jan 2017

DARUMA - Darumapedia on Facebook


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Darumapedia on Facebook

- The latest news is always HERE:



. Daruma Museum - Newsletter .  


. . . . . Expanded older entries will be added here since 2016:
. Darumapedia News at Yahoo .


. Darumapedia - small news BLOG .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


The Darumapedia has expanded over the years.
Here is a list (growing) of my presence on facebook :


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. Joys of Japan - Main Gallery .   




. Joys of Japan - Poetry for Tohoku .   



. Tohoku Japan - Information .   




. WASHOKU - Japanese Food Culture .   

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. MINGEI - Japanese Folk Art .   



. Kokeshi Gallery .   



. Japanese Festivals - Matsuri .   




. Japanese Interior Gallery .   


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. Japanese Literature .   



. Japanese People .   




. Japanese Calendar Days .   


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. Edo - the Edo Period .   



. Edo - Senryu 川柳 .



. Edo culture via Ukiyo-E 浮世絵 .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::




. Fudo Myo-O 不動明王 .   



. Jizo Bosatsu Gallery 地蔵菩薩  .

- and more -
. Buddha Statues - Japanese Deities .   



. Enku - Master Carver 円空  .




. Buddhist Temples - Japan .   



. Shinto Shrines - Japan .   


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. Japan in Spring .   

. Japan in Summer .   

. Japan in Autumn .   

. Japan in Winter .   


. Japan - New Year Season .   




. Fujisan Gallery - Japan .   



. Dragon Gallery - Asian Art and Animals .   



. Japan - Animals .   

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::




. Haiku Culture Magazin .



. Matsuo Basho .



. Kobayashi Issa .



. Yosa Buson .



. Masaoka Shiki .


. Mongolia Saijiki - Mongolian Haiku .   



. WKD - World Kigo Database .  



. Japanese Haiku Poets  .   



:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. Kappa - Kappapedia - BLOG .
河童 / 合羽 / かっぱ / カッパ - Kappa, the Water Goblin of Japan!

. Kappa - Kappa san on facebook .

. Kappa - Kappapedia - backup yahoogroups .







:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. My Treasure Box .   

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


- The latest news is always HERE:


. Darumapedia - Newsletter .  


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

--
Posted By Gabi Greve to Daruma San in Japan, Japanese Art and Culture (01)

4 Dec 2016

PERSONS - Kasane and Yoemon


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - PERSONS - ABC - LIST of this BLOG - - - .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Kasane and Yoemon 累と与右衛門

A piece of real life, about a husband killing his wife and her revenge as a ghost.
This story later became a Kabuki play.



- quote
Meiboku Kasane Monogatari
The drama "Date Kurabe Okuni Kabuki"
was premiered in the 7th lunar month of 1778 at the Nakamuraza [casting]. It had an influence on the evolutions of "Meiboku Sendai Hagi". Many scenes from "Date Kurabe Okuni Kabuki" were integrated within "Meiboku Sendai Hagi".
"The play is based on a real event involving the Date clan of Sendai during the 1660's, but censorship prevented contemporary incidents being dramatized, so the drama was set during the Muromachi period (1336-1568), and names were changed to disguise the protagonists' identity."
(text courtesy of Jean Wilson 1998)
- - - Introduction
Kinugawa Tanizô, a sumôtori patronized by Lord Ashikaga Yorikane, assassinated the courtesan Takao, Yorikane's lover, in order to save him from his scandalous love affair about to bring ruin to his household. Kinugawa Tanizô succeeded in escaping and hid himself in the village of Hanyû. Disguising himself as a farmer and calling himself Yoemon, he married Kasane, the younger sister of both Takao and the tôfu maker Saburobei. Soon after their wedding, Kasane was cursed by Takao's evil spirit and her face was horribly disfigured. Kasane was not aware of the change, however, as Yoemon forbade her to use any mirror at home.
- snip -
Dobashi - The Earthen Bridge
When she arrives at the river bank near the earthen bridge, Kasane notices the approach of Kingorô and Princess Utakata. So she hides in a bush and overhears their conversation in which Kingorô persuades Princess Utakata to marry Yoemon. Yoemon arrives and asks Kingorô to hand over Princess Utakata. As he has not brought the 100 ryô, however, Kingorô refuses to comply and, being convinced that Yoemon is in fact Kinugawa Tanizô, threatens to betray him to the magistrate's office. As Kingorô runs off in the direction of the magistrate's office, Yoemon follows him in hot pursuit.



Kasane appears from the bush and, jealous of Princess Utakata who is going to marry her husband, attacks her with a sickle. Yoemon comes back and tries to stop Kasane and in so doing accidentally cuts her wife's throat with her sickle. When she dies her face miraculously recovers its original beauty.

The tôfu maker Saburobei, Kasane's elder brother, who has been hiding in a bush, appears and goes near his sister's body. Yoemon attempts to kill himself with the sickle to atone for the horrible murder of Kasane but is dissuaded by Saburobei. He cuts off Kasane's head and takes it to the magistrate's office to pass it off as that of Princess Utakata, who is wanted by the magistrate.
- source : kabuki21.com/kasane2



Utagawa Kunisada

「与右衛門 - 松本幸四郎」Yoemon - Matsumoto Koshiro
「累 - 尾上菊五郎」Kasane - Onoe Kikugoro


..............................................................................................................................................



source : mfa.org/collections/object/unuma-yoemon ...

Unuma: Yoemon and His Wife Kasane,
from the series Sixty-nine Stations of the Kisokaidô Road (Kisokaidô rokujûkyû tsugi no uchi)
「木曾街道六十九次之内 鵜沼 与右ヱ門 女房累」
by Utagawa Kuniyoshi 1852


. Nakasendoo 中山道 Nakasendo Road - Kiso .
Gifu Prefecture
52. Unuma-juku 鵜沼宿 (Kakamigahara)


- quote -
Unuma-juku 鵜沼宿
was the fifty-second of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō.
It was also the last post station on the Inagi Kaidō. It is located in the present-day city of Kakamigahara, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The eastern and western portions of the old post town joined together to become a formal post town in 1651. Unuma-juku is approximately six kilometers from the preceding post town, Ōta-juku.


print by Keisai Eisen

The old post town contains such historical treasures as Kuan-ji Temple, the ancient tomb of Ishozuka, and haiku-engraved monuments left by Matsuo Bashō.
- source : wikipedia -

..............................................................................................................................................

. Edo Kabuki .

. Welcome to Edo 江戸 ! .


. Famous Buddhist Priests - ABC-List .

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

Kasane カサネ / かさね
On the 11th day of the 8th month in 1647, Kasane was killed by her husband Yoemon at the river Kinugawa.
He later married again, but his wives were all killed by the jealous Yurei ghost-spirit of Kasane. His 6th wife bore him a child named 菊 Kiku, but this wife was also killed in September of 1671.



When Kiku was 13 years old, Kasane tried to possess Kiku, but was finally enlightened, healed from her jealousy and could pass on to the Buddhist Paradise.

- reference : nichibun yokai database -




死霊解脱物語聞書 - 江戸怪談を読む
小二田誠二 Konita Seiji (1961 - )

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- Reference - 累と与右衛門 -
- Reference - kasane yoemon -


. Introducing Japanese Haiku Poets .

- - - #kasane #yoemon - - -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


Join the friends on facebook !


. - - - PERSONS - ABC - LIST of this BLOG - - - .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

--
Posted By Gabi Greve to PERSONS - index - PERSONEN on 12/02/2016 09:45:00 am

30 Nov 2016

EDO - Kawasaki district

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

Kawasaki district 川崎   



- quote -
Kawasaki in the Edo Period (1603 – 1867)
Kawasaki was a bustling metropolis in medieval Japan. Built at the foot of Kawasaki daishi temple, the town was an important stopping point along the Tokaido highway, which connected Kyoto and Edo (the old name for Tokyo).
The Tama River, known as Japan's "mother river," runs through Tokyo and into Kawasaki. In the past it often flooded because there were no levees in those days. Kawasaki takes its name from the Japanese word meaning "point on the river."
- More about the history of Kawasaki:
- source :kian.or.jp/home/guidetok -


川崎 六郷渡舟 Kawasaki Rokugo watashibune
Utagawa Hiroshige 歌川広重 東海道五拾三次



On the ferry boat (watashibune 渡舟) you can see a traveler relaxing while taking a smoke.


. The 53 stations of the Tokaido Road 東海道五十三次 .
2. Kawasaki-juku 川崎宿 (Kawasaki) Kanagawa


. Temple Kawasaki Daishi 川崎大師 .

..............................................................................................................................................

- quote
Kawasaki - A Military Checkpoint (Seki)
The road to Edo is busy, even this early in the morning. We are travelling along the main highway that leads from the imperial capital of Kyoto to Edo. This road, known as the Tokaido , is the busiest thoroughfare in all of Japan. It is used not only by merchants and local villagers, but also by many pilgrims making the long trip from their homes in Edo to the most important temples and shrines in western Japan. In addition, you can sometimes see large companies of samurai, marching on the long journey between their home provinces and the military capital, in Edo.

The Shogun -- the military leader who rules Japan -- does his best to ensure that free travel is maintained throughout the country. However, although even the poorest peasant is allowed to travel about the country freely, all of the main roads in and out of Edo are guarded by seki (barriers), where guards stop all travelers to search for troublemakers and check everyone for weapons. We are approaching one of the seki right now. If you look up ahead, you can see the guards standing in front of a large gate that marks the last seki on the road into Edo.

The seki are checkpoints set up at strategic locations along most of the All of these main roads are guarded by seki. In addition to helping regulate trade, these barriers are important control centers for the Shogun. It is important for the government to ensure free travel throughout the country, since this helps promote trade and economic growth. However, if people are allowed to travel freely, there is a chance that some will try to plot against the government, or take part in smuggling. The seki are one of the main systems of preventing such unlawful activity.
- snip -
Fortunately, we should be able to pass through the seki very quickly. We are just common folks, and we certainly don't look like troublemakers. There are a bunch of other farmers and laborers passing through the gates, and they all look pretty much the same. Most peasants wear simple clothes -- a kimono made of cotton, a fundoshi (loincloth) and straw sandals. A few of the more wealthy farmers may have an outer kimono, with a fancy design on it, or they may wear geta (wooden sandals) instead of sandals made from straw. None of the people passing through the gate with us has any bundles big enough to conceal a sword. Most of them are just carrying vegetables to sell in town, and some have nothing at all except a few coins to pay for the ferry boat that takes people across the river and into Edo. Japanese coins have a hole in the center, so they can be tied together on a string like beads on a necklace. This makes them easier to carry.

The guards let us pass through the gates one by one. Inside the main gates is a large building for the guards and officials who run this seki. People who are carrying large loads of merchandise have to go into the building and have their goods inspected. Merchants have to pay a tax on all of the goods that they sell, and before they ship them to other parts of the country, they have to get an official stamp to prove that they have paid the tax. The guards check these stamps and make sure that the merchants are not trying to smuggle merchandise without paying the tax. People who try to smuggle goods through without paying the tax have to pay a stiff fine -- usually, several times the amount of the original tax.

Since we don't have any heavy belongings, all we have to do is pass through a small corridor where the guards do a body search to check for weapons. There are both male and female guards, since somebody has to search the women who pass through the seki. After the guards have made sure we aren't carrying any weapons, they lead us out of the building and through another gate on the opposite side of the seki, where the road continues on towards Edo.
- source : Edomatsu

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- quote -
Kawasaki-ku (川崎区)
is one of the seven wards of the city of Kawasaki in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
..... Under the Nara period Ritsuryō system, what is now Kawasaki Ward became part of Tachibana District Musashi Province.
In the Edo period, it was administered as tenryō territory controlled directly by the Tokugawa shogunate, but administered through various hatamoto, and prospered as Kawasaki-juku, a post station on the Tokaido highway connecting Edo with Kyoto.
After the Meiji Restoration, the area urbanized with the development of Kawasaki Station on the Tokaido Main Line and became a center for heavy industry. The area was largely destroyed by the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923 and during American bombing during World War II. Kawasaki Ward was established with the division of the city of Kawasaki into wards on April 1, 1972.
Long associated with crime, labor unrest, organized crime and pollution-related diseases, the local government undertook extensive efforts in the 1990s to revamp the area image.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



- - - To join me on facebook, click the image !

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Japanese Architecture - Interior Design - The Japanese Home .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends - Introduction .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]- - - - - #kawasaki - - - -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

--
Posted By Gabi Greve to Edo - the EDOPEDIA - on 10/08/2015 09:17:00 am

TENGU - Ashitatebo Tengu Myokosan



[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Ashitateboo 足立坊 / アシタテボウ Ashitatebo, Ashitate-Bo
足立坊(あしだて) Ashidate-Bo
Myookoosan. Myōkōsan 妙高山 Myokosan - Niigata


He is one of the
. 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan .

The mountain is also called Myookoosen 妙高山 Myokosen.


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten 800

Mount Myokosan used to be called 越の中山 Koshi no Nakayama (Mountain in the Middle of the Koshi region), with the Chinese characters
Nakayama 名香山. The Characters 名香 were then read myookoo, 名香山 Myokosan, and hence the name given to the mountain today.

Ashitatebo is related to the Tengu from 飯縄系天狗 Izuna, and also seen as incarnations of 荼吉尼天 Dakini Ten.
He is a protector deity of the Mountain.

. Dakini Ten, Dakiniten 荼枳尼天 Vajra Daakini .


In Myoko Town there is a shrine 関山神社 / 關山神社 Sekiyama Jinja dedicated to the first priest who climbed the mountain in 708 and founded the shrine:


裸行上人 Ragyo Shonin "the naked saint"
a monk who came from China around 350 and practised austerities near the rivers and waterfalls of Japan.
He even went to Kumano and the 那智滝 waterfall of Nachi. He was active in bringing the Kumano belief to the mountain region of Myokosan.
(Other sources state more than one "naked saint" to bring the Kumano belief to other parts of Japan.)
Since Ragyo was always naked during his austerity practise, he got this name.

He was later deified as 関山権現 Sekiyama Gongen .


source and more photos : shashinki.blog.fc2.com/blog
関山三所権現 Three Gongen from Sekiyama


The mountain itself became related to the Paradise of Amida Nyorai 阿弥陀如来の浄土.
At the top of the mountain is a hall with Amida in the middle and 観音 Kannon and 勢至 Seishi at his side.

Sekiyama Jinja is also related to the temple 妙高山雲上寺宝蔵院 Myokosan Unjo-Ji Hozo-In.

Another Buddhist temple hall:
天狗宝窟観音 Tengu Hokutsu Kannon

.......................................................................

The Waka poet Saigyo Hoshi composed the following poem on his travels through the region:

かりがねは歸(かへ)るみちにやまよふらん越(こし)の中山(なかやま)霞へだてて
karigane wa kaeru michi ni yama yoburan Koshi no Nakayama kasumi hedatete


. Saigyoo 西行法師 Saigyo Hoshi (1118 - 1190) .

..............................................................................................................................................




- quote
Mount Myōkō (妙高山 Myōkō-san)
is an active stratovolcano in Honshu, Japan. It is situated at the southwest of Myōkō city, Niigata Prefecture, and a part of Joshinetsu Kogen National Park. Mount Myōkō is listed as one of 100 Famous Japanese Mountains, and together with Mount Yahiko (弥彦山 Yahiko-yama), it is well known as the "famous mountain" of Niigata Prefecture.
Echigofuji (越後富士) is another name given to this mountain.
..... There are onsen and ski resorts at the foot of the mountain, including Akakura, Suginohara and Ikenotaira.
- source : wikipedia

.............................................................................................................................................



the "Jumping Horse of Echigo" appears on the slope of Mount Myokosen when the snow begins to melt and announces the spring season to the farmers.
Myookoosen 妙高山の雪形 "跳ね馬 "

. Haiku from Echigo 越後 .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


- quote -
Myoko Kogen & Myoko City
Dominated by the mountain for which it is named after Myoko Kogen lays in beautiful mountain surroundings near Lake Nojiri (Nojiriko) and the historical entrance to the Echigo Plains. Mt. Myoko (Myoko-san 妙高山) is listed as one of the hundred most famous mountains in Japan with it's summit recorded as 2,454 meters above sea level. ...
- source : myoko-nagano.com/myoko-kogen -



- quote -
The Heart of Japan: Myoko Festivals & Events
There are plenty of Myoko festivals and events that take place in Myoko-Kogen and Nagano throughout the year with many of these listed below.
-- Takada o hanami (cherry blossom festival)
-- Myokokogen Kan-bara Matsuri (festival)
-- Arai Festival 新井祭り
-- Iiyama Joshi Sakura (Cherry Blossom) Festival
-- Otaya Festival おたや祭り
-- Dontoyaki Snow Hanabi
-- Na-no-hana (Canola Blossom) Festival
-- Iizuna Fire Festival
-- Sekiyama Fire matsuri
Boasting 1200 years of tradition this Myoko festival is held in the middle of July each year. Many events take place including traditional stick-fighting, pine-tree pulling, traditional dancing and sumo wrestling, plus the running of a portable mikoshi (shrine). As a finale ritual the branches of a giant pine tree are lit on fire to pray for a good harvest. Held at Sekiyama jinja.
-- and many more :
- source : myoko-nagano.com/events -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- - - - - H A I K U - - - - -

一茶墓碑四季の妙高山永久に
Issa bohi shiki no Myookoosan eikyuu ni

河野静雲 Kono Seiun (1887 - 1974)

. Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. . . CLICK here for Photos !
- reference - 日本語-
- reference - English -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #ashitatebo #ashidatebo #myokonsantengu #sekiyama -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

--
Posted By Gabi Greve to Kappa - The Kappapedia on 11/28/2016 01:16:00 pm