31 Dec 2017

DARUMA - Darumapedia on Facebook


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Darumapedia on Facebook

- The latest news is always HERE:



. Daruma Museum - Newsletter .  


. . . . . Expanded older entries will be added here since 2016:
. Darumapedia News at Yahoo .


. Darumapedia - small news BLOG .

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The Darumapedia has expanded over the years.
Here is a list (growing) of my presence on facebook :


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. Joys of Japan - Main Gallery .   




. Joys of Japan - Poetry for Tohoku .   



. Tohoku Japan - Information .   




. WASHOKU - Japanese Food Culture .   

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. MINGEI - Japanese Folk Art .   



. Kokeshi Gallery .   



. Japanese Festivals - Matsuri .   




. Japanese Interior Gallery .   


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. Japanese Literature .   



. Japanese People .   




. Japanese Calendar Days .   


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. Edo - the Edo Period .   



. Edo - Senryu 川柳 .



. Edo culture via Ukiyo-E 浮世絵 .

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. Fudo Myo-O 不動明王 .   



. Jizo Bosatsu Gallery 地蔵菩薩  .

- and more -
. Buddha Statues - Japanese Deities .   



. Enku - Master Carver 円空  .




. Buddhist Temples - Japan .   



. Shinto Shrines - Japan .   


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. Japan in Spring .   

. Japan in Summer .   

. Japan in Autumn .   

. Japan in Winter .   


. Japan - New Year Season .   




. Fujisan Gallery - Japan .   



. Dragon Gallery - Asian Art and Animals .   



. Japan - Animals .   

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. Haiku Culture Magazin .



. Matsuo Basho .



. Kobayashi Issa .



. Yosa Buson .



. Masaoka Shiki .


. Mongolia Saijiki - Mongolian Haiku .   



. WKD - World Kigo Database .  



. Japanese Haiku Poets  .   



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. Kappa - Kappapedia - BLOG .
河童 / 合羽 / かっぱ / カッパ - Kappa, the Water Goblin of Japan!

. Kappa - Kappa san on facebook .

. Kappa - Kappapedia - backup yahoogroups .







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. My Treasure Box .   

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- The latest news is always HERE:


. Darumapedia - Newsletter .  


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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Posted By Gabi Greve to Daruma San in Japan, Japanese Art and Culture (01)

19 Feb 2017

EDO - Shiba port district



[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .
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 Shiba 芝 / 柴村 Shiba mura / 芝町 Shiba machi  

芝 shiba -- grass/lawn
柴 shiba -- brushwood
斯波氏 -- the Shiba clan




- quote -
Shiba (芝) is a district of Minato, Tokyo, Japan, located near Hamamatsucho and Tamachi Stations on the Yamanote Line and Mita Station on the Toei Mita Line.
Shiba was a ward of Tokyo City from 1878 to 1947, consisting of a number of districts including Hamamatsucho, Mita, Shiba, Shinbashi, Shirokane, Takanawa and Toranomon.
Shiba is the location of Zōjō-ji temple, the Great Main Temple of the Chinzai sect of Shingon Buddhism.
Shiba is also the location of the main Minato Ward office.
- source : wikipedia -

hon Shiba 本芝 "Main Shiba"
The beginning of the 東海道 Tokaido road was located at the beach of Shiba and 高輪 Takanawa.
Many fishermen lived in this district.
The beginning of the Tokaido road was later relocated to 日本橋 Nihonbashi.



The gate 芝口御門 Shibaguchi Gomon, an outpost of Edo castle, was erected in 1616, now the district South of 田町 Tamachi station.
This gate was jokingly called 日暮の門 Higurashi no mon, because people could sit there all day and enjoy the view over Edo bay to the distand mountains of Chiba. 
The gate was later relocated in 1710, as suggested by Arai Hakuseki, at the time of the 6th Shogun, 徳川家宣 Tokugawa Ienobu. It was built to show the grandeur and power of Japan to the frequent embassies from Korea. But the gate buildings burnt down 15 years later.

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The region to the south of Shiba is called

Shibaura 芝浦 Shiba-Ura("under Shiba")


source and photos : ndl.go.jp/landmarks/sights
竹芝浦 (たけしばうら)Take-Shibaura
袖ヶ浦 (そでがうら) Sodegaura


In 1486, there is a reference to an area called 芝ノ浦 Shiba no ura. This place name uses the "grass/lawn" kanji and not the "brushwood" kanji.
The area is noted for salt production and shipping

Shiba ebi 芝海老 Shiba shrimp
. Shibaura 芝浦 Shiba-Ura - Introduction .

The Shiba clan 斯波氏 Shiba-shi
The clan claimed descent from the Minamoto Yasuuji and the Seiwa-Genji.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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- quote -
Why is Shiba called Shiba?
芝 Shiba (grass/lawn)
The first theory I came across was one that said that the grass in this part of the Musashi Plain was particularly lush. A quick search for old art depicting any areas of the vast Musashi Plain will yield pictures of tall grasses. Search for plants of the Musashi Plain and all that you'll see are lush grasses. I don't see how an area next to the sea would be particularly more luxurious than any other area.

The second theory is that the 斯波氏 Shiba clan had a residence in the area. During the Ashikaga shōgunate, the Shiba were one the families that could hold the position of 管領 kanrei deputy shōgun (literally controller). While the family line came to an end in the mid 1500's, it's not impossible to imagine that some member of the Shiba family had a residence here. However, there doesn't seem to be any collaborating evidence for this theory.

Another theory is that in the early days, when there were many shallow inlets cutting in to what is now central Tōkyō (and this part of town was literally part of the bay, the area was characterized by brushwood used to grow and harvest 海苔 nori seaweed. The general word for brushwood is 柴 shiba*. As far back as the Sengoku Period, we know there to have been a 柴村 Shiba Mura Shiba Village in the area. In the early Edo Period, 柴町 Shiba Machi Shiba Town is attested. The name change reflects an area whose population had grown substantially.
In the early Edo Period we start to see an alternate writing as 芝町 Shiba Machi.
Over the course of the Edo Period, this new variation becomes the standard and the old variant dies out. Products developed in the area develop a widespread reputation as "Shiba Machi" products – like a brand name.

- read more on this link :
- source : japanthis.com/2013 -


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- quote
Shiba - A Port District
Edo is criscrossed by rivers, moats and canals, laid out in a regular grid. In fact, the network of canals is much more organized than the narrow and rambling streets. For this reason, the most efficient means of transportation within the city, especially for heavy goods, is by boat. All of the major rivers and canals are bustling with boat traffic, and some people -- particularly fishermen and people who own barges (takase-bune) -- practically live on their boats. In fact, many people have referred to Edo as the "Venice of the East".

Edo can generally be divided into two main areas, a hilly plateau to the north and west, and a low-lying area crisscrossed by rivers and canals. Most of the daimyo and other nobles or government officials live on large estates in the hilly part of the city. This area is called the Yama-no-te (mountain's fingers), referring to the many lines of hills that run towards the coast. This area could be considered the "suburbs" of Edo, although many of these suburbs are quite close to the center of town.

On the other hand, the waterfront area of the city is where most of the common people live. This part of town is called shita-machi, which means "the lower town" or "downtown". About two-thirds of the population of Edo lives and works in the shita-machi area. Much of the land in this area was reclaimed from the bay, and rivers and canals break the area up into hundreds of separate neighborhoods, or "towns" (machi).

Each of the towns is a largely self-contained community, with its own local government and local leaders. Each machi (town) is administered by a group of local leaders called the machi-toshiyori (town elders), who are selected by a democratic vote. Everyone who owns property in the district is allowed to vote. Although the lower-class people who rent their homes do not get a vote, this system provides a certain amount of democratic political power to the people of the city, at least those in the middle class.

Although the Kanto region is one of the most fertile areas in Japan, prior to 1600 it was only sparsely populated. The area where downtown Edo is now located was covered by tidal flats, marshes, and silty islands on the shores of Edo Bay. Apart from a few fishing villages along the shore, the land was not really suitable for habitation. However, when the first Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu, established his capital here, one of the first things he did was to reclaim this broad area of marshes, to serve as the site of a new city.

An army of workers dug canals and moats, and leveled a few small hills, using the excavated earth to fill in these mudflats. The flat, hard-packed land was in an ideal location for a commercial district. It was at the head of the bay, and straddled a major river (the Sumida river), providing for good transportation both by sea and to inland areas further upriver. The many canals provided a convenient transportation network within the city, while the ports along the shore allowed the Shogun to ship in materials and goods into Edo from all over the country. Before long, the mud flats had disappeared completely and in their place was a busy, bustling town.

One of the first large-scale canals built by the Tokugawa Shoguns after they established their capital in Edo was the Dosan-bori (Dosan canal), which runs from Edo bay through the Shiba district, and up to the forecourt of the Shogun's palace. This broad waterway was used to carry all the huge stones and other materials that were used to build Edo Castle, and it continues to serve as a main route for transporting goods to the Shogun's court. For this reason, the Shiba district remains one of the three main port districts in Edo. Although Shiba is not quite as busy as nearby Tsukiji, or the major port of Minato, near Nihonbashi, it nevertheless handles a large volume of ships carrying many of Edo's most essential goods and foodstuffs from all over Japan.

Edo has been the largest city in Japan since the late 1600s. The population has soared since it became the Shogun's capital city. However, before the Tokugawa Shoguns moved to Edo, the two main cities were Kyoto and Osaka, in western Japan. Even today, most commerce, farming and manufacturing activity is concentrated in the area of western Japan, around Kyoto, Nara and Osaka. Therefore, most of the high-quality goods and a fairly large portion of the food consumed in Edo is shipped to the city from Western Japan. Because of the tremendous demand created by the one million people living in Edo, thousands of ships are needed to ship in all of the goods that the city consumes.

The traders and wholesalers of Sakai (Osaka), who control most of the shipping in Japan, have become extremely wealthy from this trade. Although merchants are considered the lowest of the social classes, the leading Osaka merchants rank among the richest families in the country. Their wealth has made many of these traders very important people. To meet the tremendous demand from people living in Edo. the ships owned by the Osaka merchants are constantly sailing into and out of the ports, bringing goods from all areas of the country. The barges and ships that fill the city's waterways are the lifeblood of commerce. Therefore, major port districts like Shiba, are crowded and bustling places.

In the dock area, workers rush to and fro unloading a multitude of different goods from the boats tied up at the docks. Purchasing agents from the wholesale "companies" negotiate with the ship owners as they watch the dock workers and unload their cargoes. They keep careful accounts of the cargo unloaded. In most cases, money does not change hands when ships are unloaded. Instead, the seller and the buyer exchange lists of the cargo delivered. These lists are stamped with the hanko (ink stamp) of both parties, and serve as a formal contract. The seller can collect payment later, by simply showing the stamped list of the cargo they delivered.

Usually, the cargo unloaded at a major port like Shiba is immediately shipped to other parts of the city by cart or barge. For example, that group of workers over there is unloading a boatfull of melons. The fruit will be taken by barge to one of the wholesale markets in Edo and sold to smaller fruit vendors. These vendors will then carry the fruit to their shops and sell it to consumers, or they may carry it through the streets selling it to passers-by.

In addition to the cargo ships tied up at the docks, there are also many watashi-bune (ferries) and pleasure boats sailing to and fro, offering travelers a ride through the city canals. Some of these boats even serve food to passengers, sort of like "floating restaurants". I have a friend who works as a ferry boat pilot in this district. If you are interested, we can hitch a ride with him to his home village, on a small island in Edo bay.
- source : Edomatsu


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Zoojooji, Zōjō-Ji 増上寺 Zojo-Ji


増上寺朝霧 Zojo-Ji in Morning Mist
歌川広重 Utagawa Hiroshige

- quote -
Zojoji was founded in 1393 as an orthodox and fundamental nembutsu seminary for Jodo shu in the Kanto (east Japan) region.
Zojoji was relocated to the present site in 1598 after Ieyasu Tokugawa, founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, entered Edo (present-day Tokyo) in 1590 to establish his provincial government. After the start of the Edo Period when the Tokugawa shogunate ruled Japan, Zojoji became the family temple of the Tokugawa family and an unparalleled grand cathedral was built....
..... as the Tokugawa shogunate came to an end and the Meiji Era started, an anti-Buddhist movement got under way. The cathedral, temples and the mausoleum of the Tokugawa family were burned down by air raids during World War II. Thus, Zojoji was profoundly affected by political and social circumstances.


..... Daiden (Hondo), which forms the core of the Buddhist structures of Zojoji, was rebuilt in 1974 by combining the traditional Buddhist temple architecture with a cream of modern architecture.

- HP of the temple :
4-7-35 Shibakoen Minato-ku, Tokyo
- source : zojoji.or.jp -

- Zojo-Ji - in the Darumapedia .
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- - - To join me on facebook, click the image !

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. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends - Introduction .

. Japanese Architecture - Interior Design - The Japanese Home .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]- - - - - #shibaport #shiba #zojoji - - - -
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Posted By Gabi Greve to Edo - the EDOPEDIA - on 10/18/2015 09:29:00 am

EDO - Gofunai temples 26 and 27



[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Gofunai 御府内八十八ヶ所霊場 88 Henro Temples in Edo .
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Nr. 26 - Raifukuji 来福寺 Raifuku-Ji

- 宝林山 Horinzan 地蔵院 Jizo-In 来福寺 Raifuku-Ji
品川区東大井3-13-1 / 3 Chome-13-1 Higashiōi, Shinagawa ward
Shingon Sect : 智山派


来福寺大師堂 Daishi Do Hall

This temple was founded in 990 by priest 智弁阿闍梨 (智瓣) Chiben Ajari.
The main statue is 延命地蔵 Enmei Jizo (経読地蔵 Kyoyomi Jizo), carved by Kobo Daishi.
Related to the shrine 梶原稲荷神社 Kajiwara Inari Jinja .

This Jizo statue had been venerated by 鎌倉権五郎景政 Kamakura Gongoro Kagemasa.

In 1501, a statue of Kyoyomi Jizo, "Jizo reading Sutras", was brought here from the 納経塚 Nokyozuka Mound.

Related to
梶原景季 Kajiwara Kagesue: 梶原塚 Kajiwara-zuka mound, 梶原の松 Kajiwara pine in the compound.
And life-extension cherry tree 延命櫻 in the compound.

The main hall has been reconstructed in 1952.

- quote -
Raifukuji
Hidden in the middle of a quiet residential area just off the Daiichi-Keihin highway in Oimachi, this temple belongs to the Shingon sect of Buddhism and is an eerily quiet oasis found at the end of a beautiful stone path.

The temple's origins
reach back into the 10th century, but the current, rather modern buildings are all built in the postwar era. In addition to the small but lush garden inside the gates, the highlight here is the monument to the indigo dealers of Awa Province (today's Tokushima Prefecture), who plied their trade in Edo from the early 17th century to the Meiji Restoration, keeping the capital's inhabitants stocked up on this blue dye that's still one of Tokushima's most famous exports.
- source : timeout.com/tokyo/museums/raifukuji -

Graves of the Indigo dealers 阿波藍商人墓標群



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Edo Meisho Zue


玉川八十八ヶ所霊場 Nr. 74 of the Tamagawa Henro Pilgrimage
東海三十三観音霊場 Nr. 2 of the Tokai Pilgrimage to 33 Kannon Temples

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- ご詠歌 - chant of the temple 金剛頂寺 Kongocho-Ji in Shikoku :
往生に望みをかくる極楽は 月のかたむく西寺の空
Ōjō ni nozomi o kakuru gokuraku wa tsuki no katamuku Nishidera no sora


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- 朱印 - stamp of the temple :


- Homepage of the temple
- source : tesshow.jp/shinagawa


. Introduction of 延命地蔵 "Jizo for a long life" .

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- - - - - #edohistory - - - - -

. Kamakura Gongorō Kagemasa 鎌倉権五郎景政 .
(1069 - ?)

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- quote -
Kajiwara Kagesue 梶原景季 / 梶原景時 Kagetoki
(1162 - February 6, 1200),
was a samurai in service to the Minamoto clan during the Genpei War of Japan's late Heian period.
The Heike monogatari records an anecdote about a friendly competition with Sasaki Takatsuna prior to the second battle of Uji. Mounted on Yoritomo's black horse, Surusumi, he races Takatsuna across the River Uji.


Kajiwara Kagesue, Sasaki Takatsuna, and Hatakeyama Shigetada racing to cross the Uji River before the second battle of Uji,
by Utagawa Kuniyoshi.

Kagesue met death in Suruga at the hands of men loyal to Minamoto no Yoriie.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


梶原稲荷神社 Kajiwara Inari Shrine
relocated here in 1320.


- source and more photos : gogohiderin.blog.fc2.com -

A legend from Nagano 草津町, Kusatsu village
where Kagesue wrote a 狂歌 Kyoka poem about 源頼朝 Minamoto no Yoritomo at Mount Asama, who got stuck there in strong rain:
「昨日こそ浅間はふらめ今日は又みはらし玉へ白雨の神」
After that, it soon stopped raining.


Kajiwara Kagetoki 梶原景時 (?1140 ( ?1162) - 1200)
In the village of 八王子村 Hachioji there is a pine named Kajiwara sugi 梶原杉 Kajiwara Pine.
It grew from a walking staff of Kagetoki, who had cut it out at Shrine 鎌倉八幡 Kamakura Hachimangu and planted it in the compound of this village.
The remains are venerated to our day:



- quote -
Kajiwara Kagetoki (梶原 景時, c.1162 – February 6, 1200)
was a spy for Minamoto no Yoritomo in the Genpei War, and a warrior against the Taira. He came to be known for his greed and treachery.
"A prominent eastern warrior", he supplied Yoshitsune with a number of ships after the Battle of Yashima.
Originally from Suruga province,
Kajiwara entered the Genpei War fighting under Oba Kagechika, against the Minamoto.



After the Taira victory at Ishibashiyama in 1181, he was sent to pursue the fleeing Minamoto no Yoritomo. Having discovered him, Kajiwara switched sides, leading his forces in another direction, and turning to Yoritomo's cause.
Three years later,
Kajiwara would lead the forces of Minamoto no Yoshitsune and Yoritomo into battle against their cousin Yoshinaka, and against the Taira.
Attached to Yoshitsune's force,
Kajiwara reported back to Yoritomo on Yoshitsune's actions, in order to satisfy Yoritomo's suspicion and distrust of his brother. In one particular episode related in The Tale of the Heike, Kajiwara suggests, during the Battle of Yashima, that Yoshitsune equip the Minamoto ships with "reverse oars" should they need to retreat quickly. Yoshitsune responds with distaste to Kajiwara's advice, humiliating him by saying such an act would be cowardice. From that point until Yoritomo's death, the resentful Kajiwara did as much as he could to raise tensions between the brothers. His slander led Yoritomo, already suspicious of his younger brother, to eventually accuse Yoshitsune of plotting against the bakufu, which then led to his exile and eventual death.
Even after this,
when the shogunate was successfully and firmly established, Kajiwara still caused tensions at court. He accused Yuki Tomomitsu of plotting against the Shogun Minamoto no Yoriie; a number of members of the court tried to get rid of him, who eventually left for Suruga. The following year (1200), he was defeated and killed in battle along with his son Kagesue.
Kajiwara Heima, a senior retainer of the Aizu domain in the 19th century, claimed descent from Kagetoki. His formal name, Kagetake (景武) shares a character with Kagetoki's name.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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kyooyomi Jizoo 経読地蔵 Kyoyomi Jizo Bosatsu reciting Sutras

There are some legends in various temples.

Kamakura 宝戒寺 Hokai-Ji


子育経読地蔵
Made in 1366 by 三条法印憲円 Sanjo Hoin Kenen. 90 cm high.
Once a woman broke down crying in front of Temple Hokai-Ji, ready to give birth.
A friendly priest came out and helped her. This must have been Jizo Bosatsu himself, people who heared her tell the story thought.
From that time on, many people at night heared a voice coming from the Jizo Statue, reading the sutras.

- reference source : www8.plala.or.jp/bosatsu -

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Suruga 国分寺 Kokubun-Ji



Near a water basin where Tokugawa Ieyasu used to wash his hands, there was a voide every night reciting the sutras.
That was very strange so one night, so when he peeked out, he saw a statue of Jizo by the basin, reciting the sutras.
He then had a hall build at 浅間神社 Asama Sengen Jinja to place the statue properly.
In the Meiji period it was replaced to its present location. Even then some people claim to have heared it recite the sutras.

- reference source : blog.goo.ne.jp/syuji -

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- reference : 経読地蔵 -

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shio Jizoo 鹽地蔵 "Salt Jizo" (see Nr. 27 below)

Kyoozenji 教善寺 Kyozen-Ji
港区六本木5-1-9 / 5 Chome-1-9 Roppongi, Minato ward
People come here and offer some 塩 salt with the wish to have their eye disease healed.

Genkakuji 源覚寺 Genkaku-Ji
文京区小石川2-23-14 / 2 Chome-23-14 Koishikawa, Bunkyō ward

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shio Jizoo 塩地蔵 "Salt Jizo"

東京とその近郊の塩地蔵図鑑
- reference source : 石仏散歩 -

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. Shioname Jizo 塩嘗地蔵 Salt-tasting Jizo in Kamakura .

. Jizō - Jizo Bosatsu 地蔵菩薩 - ABC List .



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Nr. 27 - Shookooin 正光院 Shoko-In

- 瑠璃山 Rurizan 正光院 Shoko-In
港区元麻布3-2-20 / 3 Chome-2-20 Motoazabu, Minato ward
Shingon Sect : 真言宗



This temple was founded in 1630 by High Priest 法印宥専大和尚,
on behalf of 筑前福岡2代藩主 黒田忠之 Kuroda Tadayuki, second Daimyo of the Chikuzen Fukuoka Domain.
Tadayuki had called priest 宥専 from Mount Koyasan, where he had venerated the statue of Yakushi Nyorai, also named 里俗子安薬師 Rizoku Koyasu Yakushi.
The temple became the clan temple for the Kuroda family.

The main statue is 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai / 子安薬師 Koyasu Yakushi to protect children .
The statue was made by 恵心僧都 源信 Eshin Sozu Genshin in the middle Heian period, carved at the birth of 一条天皇 Ichijo Tenno (980 - 986) with the prayers for the baby to grow up healthy. This wooden statue was lost in WWII, the present statue is a gift from Mount Koyasan.

In the compound are also halls for 不動堂 Fudo Myo-O and 地蔵堂 Jizo Bosatsu.
The Fudo Hall is also known as 麻布大山不動.
The Jizo hall is also known as 子育鹽地蔵. (Salt Jizo)
The Jizo is a stone statue, originally placed at the shrine 霞山櫻田神社 Kazan Sakurada Jinja , which was in the compound of the temple.

. Azabu Fudozaka no Ichigan Fudo .

. Ichijō-tennō, Ichijoo Tennoo 一条天皇 Emperor Ichijo / Ichijyo .
(980 – 1011) - the 66th Emperor

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- ご詠歌 - chant of the temple 神峯寺 Konomine-Ji in Shikoku :
みほとけのめぐみの心神峯山も誓いも高き水音
Mihotoke no megumi no kokoro koonomine yama mo chikai mo takaki mizuoto


. 27 - 竹林山 Chikurinzan 地蔵院 Jizo-In 神峯寺 Konomine-Ji / Shikoku .

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- 朱印 - stamp of the temple :


- Homepage of the temple
- source : tesshow.jp/minato


. Introduction of Yakushi Nyorai .

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- - - - - #edohistory - - - - -

. The Kuroda clan of Fukuoka .
Kuroda Kanbei Yoshitaka 黒田官兵衛 孝高 - (1546 - 1604)
His son, Kuroda Nagamasa 黒田長政 - (1586 - 1623)

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Sakuradajinja 櫻田神社 Shrine Sakurada Jinja

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One of the most interesting shrines found in Roppongi is the Sakurada Shrine. The shrine sits right within a standard busy street and can only be recognized by the large torii gate out front. Once you pass through the torii gate, it feels as though you have been transported out of the big city of Roppongi and deep into nature. The shrine is surrounded in luscious trees and greenery and is absolutely stunning.
The prize possession of the Sakurada Shrine
is their extremely large Ten-sui-oke 天水桶, a kind of basin for saving water from rain.

The Ten-sui-oke
at this shrine has existed for over 200 years. In Japanese, "ten" means the sky or heaven, "sui" means water, and "oke" means pail or box. When we visited the Sakurada Shrine, we were taught by one of the priests that rain is a present from the kami (Shinto deities) of the sky. This is believed because the houses from this time period were only made out of wood, and therefore house fires were very common. The Japanese believed that the rain was given to them by the kami so that they had a force to fight back against fires. The Japanese believed that the only way to put out their fires is with rain that had been presented by the kami. This is why "rain" at the time was referred to as "tensui" or "heaven water." This story truly shows the spirit and culture behind Japanese religion and faith.
- source : sanpai-japan.com/2016 -


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- reference : 御府内八十八 来福寺 -
- reference : 御府内八十八 正光院 -

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- Koya San in Wakayama 和歌山 高野山 -

- Kobo Daishi Kukai 弘法大師 空海 (774 - 835) -

. Gyoki Bosatsu 行基菩薩 (668 - 749) Saint Gyōki .

. Shikoku Henro Temple List 四国遍路  .

. Gofunai 御府内八十八ヶ所霊場 Pilgrimage to 88 Henro Temples in Edo .
- Introduction -

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. Join the Updates of Facebook ! .

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .

. Welcome to Edo 江戸 ! – The Edopedia .

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Posted By Gabi Greve to Gokuraku - Jigoku on 1/18/2017 01:36:00 pm